From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

Texas has it all

August 4, 2021


 Highslide JS

Every thought about all the different towns in Texas? Someone sent this information to me that I thought was interesting. This is just a sample -- will try to share more another time about our great state. Hope you enjoy.

Just Texas
Pep, Texas 79353
Smiley, Texas 78159
Paradise, Texas 76073
Rainbow, Texas 76077
Sweet Home, Texas 77987
Comfort, Texas 78013
Friendship, Texas 76530

Love the sun?
Sun City, Texas 78628
Sunrise, Texas 76661
Sunset, Texas 76270
Sundown, Texas 79372
Sunray, Texas 79086
Sunny Side, Texas 77423

Want something to eat?
Bacon, Texas 76301
Noodle, Texas 79536
Oatmeal, Texas 78605
Turkey, Texas 79261
Trout, Texas 75789
Sugar Land, Texas 77479
Salty, Texas 76567
Rice, Texas 75155
Pearland, Texas 77581
Orange, Texas 77630

And top it off with:
Sweetwater, Texas 79556

Why travel to other cities? Texas has them all!
Detroit, Texas 75436
Cleveland, Texas 75436
Colorado City, Texas 79512
Denver City, Texas 79323
Klondike, Texas 75448
Pittsburg, Texas 75686
Newark, Texas 76071
Nevada, Texas 75173
Memphis, Texas 79245
Miami, Texas 79059
Boston, Texas 75570
Santa Fe, Texas 77517
Tennessee Colony, Texas 75861
Reno, Texas 75462
Pasadena, Texas 77506
Columbus, Texas 78934

Feel like traveling outside the country?
Athens, Texas 75751
Canadian, Texas 79014
China, Texas 77613
Dublin, Texas 76446
Egypt, Texas 77436
Ireland, Texas 76538
Italy, Texas 76538
Turkey, Texas 79261
London, Texas 76854
New London, Texas 75682
Paris, Texas 75460
Palestine, Texas 75801

We even have a city named after our planet!
Earth, Texas 79031

Exhausted?
Energy, Texas 76452

Cold?
Blanket, Texas 76432
Winters, Texas 79567

For the kids...
Kermit, Texas 79745
Elmo, Texas 75118
Nemo, Texas 76070
Tarzan, Texas 79783
Winnie, Texas 77665
Sylvester, Texas 79560

Old friend Robert said, "Some folks look at me and see a certain swagger, which in Texas is called 'walking."

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111


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From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

How do you respond to the storm?

July 27, 2021



One thing we can count on in life and that is we all will face different storms that will come into our lives. It is very interesting to see how people handle the various storms or situations in life.

I have lived long enough to have faced almost everything life has to offer. While I can adjust to most things -- I have always been intrigued by one kind of person that I still meet on a regular basis.

Here is what I am talking about. Have you ever encountered a person who is quick to jump on someone when they have found that person has made a mistake? Yet -- they are the same person, when they make a mistake, want someone to give them the benefit of the doubt and offer immediate forgiveness.

Quick to judge and condemn -- yet they want immediate forgiveness and understanding when they fail.

It's almost like we live in a society that loves to see others fail.

Everyday we turn on the TV and hear about the failures of others. You hear conversations from others who relish in other people's down fall.

I have recently encountered these kind of people and you can see from the expression on their faces the hatred and anger that comes flowing out of their lives to jump on someone who they feel has offended or wronged them.

There is no outer joy because there is no inward peace. In all honesty -- they have trouble liking themselves. And others try to avoid them when they see them coming.

They become a storm that invades our lives. So what do we do?

I read something interesting the other day in the way they are fighting some of the wild fires.

The Native Americans saved their villages from raging prairie fires years ago. They actually set a fire to stop a fire. They burned the ground around the village to deprive the fire of the fuel it needed. And they said, "The fire cannot come where the fire has already been."

One man in Indiana lost his house and his horses, but was thanking God his family was okay, and they were quoting him. His comment was that "he had enough warning of the storms' approach to leave for safer ground." And so he said, "Thank God."

In short -- we have to learn to avoid the storm and take refuge to the things we know that are right. In all cases -- don't allow the storms of others invade our hearts and lives.

I've said it before and I'll say it again. "Hurt People - Hurt People!" Remember that when someone attacks you with their storm of destruction. Their hurtful words. Their critical remarks! Their condemning spirit. You need to look deeper into the storm and seek higher ground.

Old friend Robert said, "A part of kindness consists in loving people more than they deserve."

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111


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From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

Is it hot or what?

July 20, 2021



No one disputes that this is a hot and dry summer. It is that way all across the country. One knows it for a fact when they get their electric bill. I have taken the advice of someone who suggested to buy some of those small $15 fans at Walmart and position them around the room that you stay in the most.

I can tell you that I have a small fan aimed at my lounge chair and it sure is comfortable while drinking a big glass of tea!

There is no doubt that if you go out to work in your yard -- you are going to come back in your home sweating like a stuck pig!

Fortunately -- there are some of my former classmates who have a sense of humor regarding the heat in Oklahoma. I received some E-mails letting me know what it is like in my home state.

  • A buddy out of McAlester said he'd killed a mosquito that was carrying a canteen.
  • A friend in Lawton said the chicken farmers were giving the chickens crushed ice to keep them from laying hard-boiled eggs.
  • A friend in Ada, which is my college town, said they caught a 20lb. catfish that had ticks on it!
  • This week, in Okmulgee, a fire hydrant was seen bribing a dog.
  • They say it's so dry in Oklahoma that the Baptists are starting to baptize by sprinkling.
  • The Methodists are using wet-wipes.
  • The Presbyterians are giving out rain-checks.
  • And the Catholics are praying for the wine to turn back into water.
  • In Norman, the University of Oklahoma football players are not allowed to sweat.
  • In Duncan, which is my home town, the city has issued the following: Toilets are to be flushed according to street number, odd numbers on Tuesday and Saturday, even numbers on Wednesday and Sunday.
  • The Tulsa City Manager is urging families and friends to shower together.
  • The Oklahoma City Parks and Recreation Department has prohibited toddlers from drinking pool water.
  • Another friend from Hooker (just south of the Kansas border) has a corn field and he reports that it is so hot that every day he goes out to gather up all the popcorn in his field. He calls it manna from heaven.
  • It was reported in Altus that birds have to use potholders to pull worms out of the ground.
  • In the heart of Oklahoma's Amish Country near Inola, townspeople saw an Amish guy buying an air conditioner.
  • It was so hot in Chickasaw that people saw a chicken lay a fried egg.
  • And finally, in El Reno, it was so hot a funeral procession pull into a Dairy Queen.
Old friend Robert said, "I hope you find a shady spot and enjoy a cool breeze here in Pearland. Just remember -- when it is 115 degrees in Phoenix, Arizona -- it is a dry heat!"

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111


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From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

Little known facts about Texas

July 13, 2021



I was born and reared (which is proper grammar) in Oklahoma. I was reared to be an Oklahoma Sooner and to not like Texas very much. That worked fine until I moved from Oklahoma to Texas in 1974.

Nobody has asked for these astounding facts -- but I thought I would give them to you anyway.

Did you know that from Beaumont to El Paso is 742 miles. From Beaumont to Chicago is only 770 miles. If you take I-10 to El Paso from Houston -- you are exactly half way to Los Angeles -- yet you haven't left the state of Texas. In fact - El Paso is closer to California than to Dallas.

You might like to know that the world's first rodeo was in Pecos on July 4, 1883.

The Flagship Hotel in Galveston is the only hotel in North America built over water.

The Heisman Trophy was named after John William Heisman who was the first full-time coach for Rice University.

Brazoria County has more species of birds than any other area in North America.

Aransas Wildlife Refuge is the winter home of North America's only remaining flock of whooping cranes.

Jalapeno jelly originated in Lake Jackson in 1978.

The worst natural disaster in U.S. history was in 1900 caused by a hurricane in which over 8,000 lives were lost on Galveston Island.

The first word spoken from the moon, July 20, 1969, was "Houston."

King Ranch is larger than Rhode Island.

Tropical Storm Claudette brought a U.S. rainfall record of 43" in 24 hours in and around Alvin in July 1979.

Texas is the only state to enter the U.S. by TREATY, instead of by annexation. (This allows the Texas flag to fly at the same height as the US flag.)

A Live Oak tree near Fulton is estimated to be 1,500 years old.

Caddo Lake is the only natural lake in the state.

Dr Pepper was invented in Waco in 1885. There is no period after Dr in Dr Pepper.

Texas has had six capital cities:.
  1. Washington-on-the-Brazos
  2. Harrisburg
  3. Galveston
  4. Velasco
  5. West Columbia
  6. Austin

The Capitol Dome in Austin is the only dome in the U.S. which is taller than the Capitol Building in Washington D.C. (by 7 feet).

The name Texas comes from the Hasini Indian word "tejas" meaning friends. Tejas is not Spanish for Texas.

The State animal is the Armadillo. (An interesting bit of trivia about the armadillo is they always have four babies! They have one egg which splits into four and they either have four males or four females).

The first domed stadium in the U.S. was the Astrodome in Houston.

I'm not sure that you can ever really take out the OKIE from someone born north of the Red River -- but I must admit that I'm right proud to live in Texas.

Old friend Robert said, "Texans ain't Texans if they aren't willing to boast about the state they call home."

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111


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From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

Shadows we run from

July 7, 2021



I remember as a little boy playing little league baseball in my hometown of Duncan, Oklahoma. I didn't live but just a few minutes away from the baseball field as it was just down the street from my home.

It was strange in those early years as I loved to play baseball, but I didn't like my parents to watch me. I told them it made me nervous.

Yet -- when I took the field, I could see my mom and dad hiding behind a light pole. Just as long as I didn't let them know that I saw them made it alright for me to do my best playing in the game.

Don't ask me why -- just a strange quirk of mine as a kid.

After the game - they would leave and walk home. I was always one of the last to leave the field. I just loved to play and would squeeze every drop out of being at the field with my teammates.

I remember one night after they turned out the lights and I began my short walk home alone. I was about 10-years old and as I was walking -- it felt like someone was right behind me. I glanced back and I could see a shadow -- my heart began to pound -- and I took off running.

As I looked back a little - I could still see the shadow and I began to run faster. Approaching close to home - I took one more glance and then bam! I ran into a thick wire holding up an old-time television antennae and it slammed me to the ground.

After I gathered myself, I looked around and no one was there. And then I realized I was running from my own shadow.

Over 60 years has passed since that frightful night and I have come to learn something about that experience. People of all ages run from their shadows of life. While there are many that I could mention -- one comes to the forefront and that is the "Shadow of Unhappiness."

When people are unhappy -- they tend to make others unhappy. Ever notice? People are running from shadows in search of happiness.

A recent poll revealed that 60 percent of those over 40 regarded life as basically without meaning.

George Bernard Shaw called it "a flame that is always burning itself out."

E. V. Cook spoke of it as "a hollow bubble."

William Shakespeare declared it "a walking shadow."

Isaac Watts referred to life as "a long tragedy."

John Masefield described it as "a long headache in a noisy street."

One thing I would suggest and that is when you have those in your life that bring joy and happiness -- meaning and fulfillment -- make sure you cherish them with all of your heart. Life is too short!

When you find purpose and happiness in life -- there won't be a shadow to run from. Instead - you will find yourself running toward the Light.

Old friend Robert said, "When walking through the 'valley of shadows' - remember - a shadow is cast by a Light."

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111


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From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

Let Freedom Ring

June 30, 2021



Years ago one of our American submarines sank off the eastern coast. Divers attempted to rescue them and when they went down, they could hear the survivors tapping on the side of that submarine in Morse Code.

They were tapping a question: ''Is there any hope? Is there any hope?'' And that same question is being asked today across America: ''Is there any hope for America?''

As the 245th birthday of America approaches ... I want to show you that there is hope for America!

Regardless of what's being written and taught today ... we are the only nation on earth built upon the Christian faith!

President George Washington said, ''It would be impossible to govern rightly without God and the Bible.''

Present John Adams said, ''It would be impossible to govern without God and the Ten Commandments.''

The Pilgrim Charter of 1620 states that its purpose was ''to advance the enlargement of the Christian religion to the glory of God Almighty.''

Before the Pilgrims arrived on our shores they gathered below the deck of the Mayflower and signed the Mayflower Compact which revealed their intent: ''for the glory of God.''

In 1632 .... when Maryland was chartered as a colony, they wrote, ''We are motivated with the pious zeal for extending the Christian religion.''

Andrew Jackson ..the 7th President said, ''The Bible is the rock upon which our Republic rest.''

The last sentence of the Declaration of Independence signed 245 years ago says, ''For the support of this declaration, with a firm reliance upon the protection of the Divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other, our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.''

Eight days after signing the Declaration of Independence ... printed on the side of the Liberty Bell...Leviticus 25:10, “Proclaim liberty throughout all the land unto all the inhabitants thereof.”

When I mention 1776 to you - what comes to your mind? I guarantee at least two things - the Declaration of Independence and the 4th of July. Both a date and a document point to one thing that gives them such meaning even to this day and that is freedom.

When our Founding Fathers decided to risk life and limb to begin this ''grand experiment'' called America they did not know a lot about what they ''did'' want. They knew a lot more about what they ''didn't'' want. They didn't want tyranny. They didn't want taxation without representation. They didn't want an absentee landlord from an ocean away running their lives and calling the shots. They wanted freedom.

We live in a free country. Our freedom is no accident. It is God-given. However, it has been preserved by brave men and women who have sacrificed their very lives so that we might remain free. With all of my heart I pray that we might continue to enjoy this great freedom -- that our children and grandchildren may know and experience the joy and blessedness of the freedom that we have known -- ''that we might stand fast in the liberty with which Christ hath made us free.''

Old friend Robert said, "One flag, one land, one heart, one hand, one nation forevermore! God Bless America, my home, sweet home."

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111


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From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

2021 Football media guide ads now being accepted

June 22, 2021



The 2021 high school football season is approaching Pearland and Dawson High Schools.

It is also time for area businesses to plan on placing an ad in the football publications. Since I produce the media guides for Dawson and Pearland, there is still space available in these full-color publications for the 2021 football season. But the deadlines are soon approaching.

For the sixth consecutive year -- both media guides finished in the top two in the nation at the National High School Sports Media Publications Contest with Dawson winning the Grand Award as the top entry of any class and Pearland finishing No. 1 in schools with 2,000 or more students.

Both publications can be seen at http://www.reporternewssports.com/ -- just click on a cover and turn the pages.

Each booster club manages 100 percent of the money and they can account for every dime spent in these ventures. Plus - each school has a first-class media guide to present to their fans and visiting teams.

If you are interested in placing an ad in these media guides, please give me a call or Email me and I will send you the details of what you need to do.

Both communities need to realize that they can support their individual teams while knowing that all of the money stays at home. Every check is made out to the right organization of each school and they control all finances without any funny business.

I can be reached at 281.997.6800 or 713.449.7474 or E-mail me at drdaviddavis@yahoo.com to let me know of your interest.

Here are the following E-mails to let us know of your interest in placing a business ad.

   • pearlandfootball@yahoo.com

   • dawsonfootballprogram@yahoo.com

Also -- if you are a parent and want to place a personal ad for your son or daughter in any of these football media guides -- you can use the same E-mail addresses to contact us for the information sheet for each submission. Make plans now as space is limited. Don't wait until the final deadlines in August.

Old friend Robert said, "Texas has four seasons: winter, spring, summer, and football."

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111


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From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

I HATE BROCCOLI

June 14, 2021



Imagine going into a restaurant to order dinner. After ordering your entrée, the server waits for your selection of vegetables. As you look over the list of vegetables on the menu, you notice (there it is again) -- BROCCOLI is on the menu. It's always on the menu. You HATE broccoli!!!!

Now, what do you do? React by throwing the menu on the floor and saying, "When are they going to stop putting broccoli on the menu? I hate broccoli! Or, do you just not choose it or if it automatically comes with the entrée, you choose not to "bite" on it.

Isn't that the way life goes? You leave the walls of your home each day to enter, if you please, the menu of life to face people who remind you of a broccoli. They are people who make you angry, hostile, and in truth, they bring out the worst in you.

Now a broccoli might like to be a steak, but it doesn't know how. All it can be is broccoli. The people that yell in angry, hostile ways "at" you are just being themselves. They are just being broccoli. That's the way they talk to their children, their spouse, their co-workers or anyone else they deal with. Just look at the person and, with a warm smile, say to yourself, "They're just broccoli on the menu. I knew it would be there, and I won't "bite" on it anymore."

The choice is yours! You can react, become resentful, and then retaliate. Or you can respond, rejoice, and release love toward those who react in a negative way. The difference is the choice. There is a world of difference between the person who chooses to react versus the person who responds to the circumstances of life.

You see, the person who reacts does so on impulse. They are characterized by a short temper, cutting words, and a critical spirit. However, the person who responds takes time to think before they speak. They seek to understand before judging, and are willing to offer a second chance to one who has failed. Which one are you? A reactor or responder?

Old friend Robert says, "Next time you see broccoli on the menu...smile and say, 'Hello!' I knew you would be there. I'll have the steak and baked potato, thank you!"

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111


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From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

Reflections on social media

June 8, 2021



I recently heard an interview with Alabama head coach Nick Saban regarding his views on social media. No one questions the football program that Saban has built.

After having a successful stint with LSU where he captured a national title in 2003, Saban has won BCS and AP national championships with Alabama. He has a 256–65–1 overall collegiate record and makes over $10 million dollars after signing a three-year extension contract with Alabama.

Saban won his sixth national championship at Alabama and seventh of his career in 2020 by defeating Ohio State 52-24. The win gave Saban the most national titles of all time, breaking Paul Bear Bryant's previous record of 6.

It was noted in the interview that Saban doesn't have a twitter account. When asked why, he said that he would just rather speak to someone instead of communicating on social media.

"When I want to talk to someone, I prefer to pick up the phone and talk directly to them," Saban said. "My coaches will tell you that is my preference. Same with a potential player."

He then added, "I think that approach had been pretty successful for us at Alabama."

Cell phones, texting, Instagram, snapchat, twitter, etc. has taken over our entire society and the way we communicate with others.

In the dark ages, we would see something on the news and tell a friend or family member what we wish we could do in response to what we heard.

Now -- we have a cell phone in our hands that allows us to say what we think no matter how unkind or inappropriate it may be.

I have watched over the last several years and noticed that people have lost their jobs all because they couldn't control their thoughts via social media.

Even the former President was banned from several social media platforms because he couldn't contain himself.

There has been so much in the news in reference to racism and police brutality. I'm convinced that much of that is created by the news media.

That great theologian, Charles Barkley, said at an athletic event, "I don't think that white people hate black people and black people hate white people. I believe that if people would stop listening to the media outlets, we would all get along."

I agree!

I grew up in the 60's when our country was genuinely racist. I thought we had finally moved on from those dark days in America.

I'm thankful in Pearland -- from what I have seen living here the past 32 years -- we get along with one another and we have one of the finest police departments that can be found anywhere in our nation.

Getting along with others shouldn't be hard to do. My life verse found in the Bible is Ephesians 4:32 which says, "And be ye kind one to another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, even as God for Christ's sake hath forgiven you."

I believe we ought to have more kindness towards one another so that we can all get along. The verse before that says, "Let all bitterness, and wrath, and anger, and clamour, and evil speaking, be put away from you, with all malice:"

Life is too short to live in turmoil. May we all make a commitment to love one another and make the lives of others better -- not bitter. Just a few thoughts from someone who is older and wiser than in previous years.

Old friend Roberts said, "Be kind whenever possible. It is always possible. A part of kindness consists in loving people more than they deserve."

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111


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From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

And you thought you heard it all

June 1, 2021



I recently received an E-mail from someone regarding those who are actually walking around in our society. Their answers to a GED exam will make you shake your head.

These are the kind of students who would make you want to drive your vehicle into a wall

Here are genuine answers (from 16 year old's) and they are the ones who will breed and vote.

Q. Name the four seasons
A. Salt, pepper, mustard and vinegar

Q. Explain one of the processes by which water can be made safe to drink
A. Flirtation makes water safe to drink because it removes large pollutants like grit, sand, dead sheep and canoeists

Q. How is dew formed
A. The sun shines down on the leaves and makes them perspire

Q. What causes the tides in the oceans
A. The tides are a fight between the earth and the moon. All water tends to flow towards the moon, because there is no water on the moon, and nature abhors a vacuum. I forget where the sun joins the fight

Q. What guarantees may a mortgage company insist on
A. If you are buying a house they will insist that you are well endowed

Q. What are steroids
A. Things for keeping carpets still on the stairs (Shoot yourself now , there is little hope)

Q. What happens to a boy when he reaches puberty

A. He says goodbye to his boyhood and looks forward to his adultery.

Q. Name a major disease associated with cigarettes
A. Premature death

Q. How can you delay milk turning sour
A. Keep it in the cow (Simple, but brilliant)

Q. How are the main 20 parts of the body categorised (e.g. The abdomen)
A. The body is consisted into 3 parts - the brainium, the borax and the abdominal cavity. The brainium contains the brain, the borax contains the heart and lungs and the abdominal cavity contains the five bowels: A, E, I,O,U.

Q. What is the fibula?
A. A small lie

Q. What does 'varicose' mean?
A. Nearby

Q. What is the most common form of birth control
A. Most people prevent contraception by wearing a condominium

Q. Give the meaning of the term 'Caesarean section'
A. The caesarean section is a district in Rome

Q. What is a seizure?
A. A Roman Emperor. (Julius Seizure, I came, I saw, I had a fit)

Q. What is a terminal illness
A. When you are sick at the airport. (Irrefutable)

Q. Give an example of a fungus. What is a characteristic feature?
A. Mushrooms. They always grow in damp places and they look like umbrellas

Q. Use the word 'judicious' in a sentence to show you understand its meaning
A. Hands that judicious can be soft as your face.

Q. What does the word 'benign' mean?
A. Benign is what you will be after you be eight (brilliant)

Q. What is a turbine?
A. Something an Arab or Sheik wears on his head

Old friend Robert said, "It's the stupid questions that have some of the most surprising and interesting answers. Most people never think to ask the stupid questions."

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111


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From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

Graduation is just around the corner

May 27, 2021



Most young people think they will never get out of school. And then, all of sudden, so it seems, it is here. That day that seemed so far in the future will soon become a distant past in life. And believe me, my mother was right when she said, "The older you get - the faster time goes by." I didn't believe her then, but I sure do now!

I was reading this week some thoughts regarding high school seniors. One thought expressed it this way, "It never occurs to a senior boy that he will some day be as dumb as his father."

Or -- how about?

It was graduation day, and a mother was trying to take a picture of her son in his cap and gown posed with his father.

"Let's try to make this look natural," she said. "Billy, put your arm around your dad's shoulder."

The father answered, "If you want it to look natural, why not have him put his hand in my pocket?"

It is probably the most emotional and pivotal occasion in a person's life. A wedding? Sure, the tears flow. But often the couple keep the same address and the same jobs.

No, I mean a high school graduation. Here you get tears, fears, and joy, all wrapped up in one week long celebration.

All over the country, young men and women, technically still high schoolers, are donning cap and gown, and by the time they take them off, they're young adults, heading on to summer or full-time jobs, checkbooks and loans, college and careers.

Their commencement speeches are filled with obvious glee that they survived the most emotional years of their lives. They are also filled with words like "scared." They've grown mature enough to understand the next years of their lives are going to be mighty different. And in most cases, the graduates will be facing life without parents waking them if the alarm doesn't go off and without friends they've shared many or all of their grade school, middle school, junior high, and high school years.

Their senior slide shows chronicle the life they've lived -- in and outside the school walls. There's someone sleeping in class. There are buddies -- posing for the camera. There's the pom pom squad and the football players after their big victory. There they are eating in the cafeteria. There are pictures of special trips they've shared.

Of course, parents always get involved in these slide shows and make sure that their son or daughter are shown in the bathtub when they were little babies or with baby food pasted all over their face.

Don't worry - you will do the same when you have children of your own. It is called "parents' revenge."

If these graduates have their way, years from now they'll be the architects and artists, beauticians and businesspersons, carpenters and computer scientists, educators and engineers, interior designers and journalists, mathematicians and nurses, physicians and psychologists.

Some will be heading into the military to protect our freedoms. Another small group is "undecided."

That word "dream" comes up often during the graduation ceremony. It is a time to dream dreams -- step out toward your life goals -- see the world in a whole new way -- and chart your course on the sea of life.

No one asked me to address this year's graduates, but if I could, my message would be simple.

No matter the distance, hold tight to your parents, sisters and brothers, and all of your family. Remember who ran up to the school with the homework you forgot at home.

Keep in touch with your other greatest supporters -- your friends -- if even by E-mail. Hold to your ideals. And don't ever let anyone tell you it can't be done!

There are too many people who never ventured out in life to take that trip they never dreamed was possible. But when they did -- they were never the same when they returned home because a whole new world was opened to them.

Above all -- keep your faith in God and in others at the forefront of your life. Sure, people will disappoint you, but that is part of life. You will learn to discover those that you can really trust.

Old friend Robert said, "If you have a dream -- go for it! You will be glad you did."

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111


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From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

Nostalgia...

May 17, 2021



Nostalgia. One word that means so much and covers a large period of time that seems only like yesterday. As I recently saw a definition of nostalgia which read , "That abnormal yearning within us to step into the time tunnel and recover the irrecoverable. That wistful dream, that sentimental journey taken within the mind -- always traveled alone and therefore seldom discussed."

Funny how it was when we were kids. We hardly remembered anything that our parents told us -- and yet, as adults -- we recall 20, 30, 40, or more years of what our parents said as if it were just yesterday.

Don't worry -- your kids may not remember what you teach them or show them today, but they will later on. We are all proof of that aren't we?

This time of year -- the clear nights with the stars twinkling at us as if they know we are looking exactly at them, and the early morning sunrise reminds us that we are wondrously made and live at a most blessed time.

Taking the time to remember is healthy and allows us to recall those special moments in life despite the daily pressure of meeting life's deadlines, fulfilling the expectations of others, and facing the turmoil that life has to offer which is constantly blaring from our televisions and radios.

Nostalgia.

Here's where it sometimes starts.

   * A walk in the park.

   * A quiet visit to the place where you were raised.

   * Looking over old photos when you were growing up.

   * Watching your now-grown "child" getting ready to flap their wings out of the nest.

   * Standing silently beside the grave of a close, personal friend or relative.

   * The smell of cooking outdoors.

   * An old letter, bruised with age, signed by one who loved you.

   * Getting alone - all alone -- and taking the time to remember.

   * Saying good-bye.

Ah, yes -- you've been there. I can tell by that smile that you're trying to hide.

I get tickled when I hear some of the old timers say, "Those were the good 'ole days." Of course -- when you talk to those who went through the Great Depression - World World II - the Korean War -- and, in my case, the Vietnam conflict -- those weren't the "good 'ole days." But - they were times when people appreciated what little they had and what they have now -- or at least they should.

I think it is healthy to get alone and think about things in the past -- especially those events or people that have touched our lives in an unforgettable way.

While, in most cases, we can't make the past into the present -- we can certainly be filled with thoughts that bring a little smile to our face and a peace that can't be purchased.

However, we should never make the mistake of just living in the past and ignoring the present opportunities that life affords us.

Those special events or people that invade our lives give us an opportunity to make new and lasting memories that can never be taken away from us. And sometimes they come when you least expect it...and then you are never the same.

So - take a drive and get alone sometime this week -- even if it's for only an hour. Give nostalgia the go-ahead signal. Let it run free -- release your grip and see where it takes you.

Old friend Robert said, "Some days -- I wish I could go back in life -- not to change anything -- but to feel a few things twice."

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111


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From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

Mother's Day Thoughts

May 3, 2021



This coming Sunday is Mother's Day. I hope it is a special time at your home. I know I am thankful for the influence that my mom provided me. She went to her heavenly home on May 3, 2020 after being on this earth for 93 years. I love and miss her very much.

I still get amused when you ask children about their family. The following things were sent to me last week so I thought I would share them with you. I'm sure you would agree that only through the mouths of babes can you get these kinds of insights about mom.

WHY GOD MADE MOMS

Answers given by 2nd grade school children to the following questions:

Why did God make mothers?
    1. She's the only one who knows where the scotch tape is.
    2. Mostly to clean the house.
    3. To help us out of there when we were getting born.
How did God make mothers?
    1. He used dirt, just like for the rest of us.
    2. Magic plus super powers and a lot of stirring.
    3. God made my mom just the same like he made me. He just used bigger parts.
What ingredients are mothers made of?
    1. God makes mothers out of clouds and angel hair and everything nice in the
    world and one dab of mean.
    2. They had to get their start from men's bones. Then they mostly use
    string, I think.
Why did God give you your mother and not some other mom?
    1. We're related.
    2. God knew she likes me a lot more than other people's mom like me.
What kind of a little girl was your mom?
    1. My mom has always been my mom and none of that other stuff.
    2. I don't know because I wasn't there, but my guess would be pretty bossy.
    3. They say she used to be nice.
What did mom need to know about dad before she married him?
    1. His last name.
    2. She had to know his background. Like is he a crook? Does he get drunk on
    beer?
    3. Does he make at least $800 a year? Did he say NO to drugs and YES to
    chores?
Why did your mom marry your dad?
    1. My dad makes the best spaghetti in the world. And my mom eats a lot.
    2. She got too old to do anything else with him.
    3. My grandma says that mom didn't have her thinking cap on.
Who's the boss at your house?
1. Mom doesn't want to be boss, but she has to because dad's such a goof
    ball.
    2. Mom. You can tell by room inspection. She sees the stuff under the bed.
    3. I guess mom is, but only because she has a lot more to do than dad.
What's the difference between moms and dads?
    1. Moms work at work and work at home and dads just go to work at work.
    2. Moms know how to talk to teachers without scaring them.
    3. Dads are taller and stronger, but moms have all the real power cause
    that's who you got to ask if you want to sleep over at your friends.
    4. Moms have magic, they make you feel better without medicine.

HAPPY MOTHER'S DAY!

Old friend Robert said, "A mother is the only person on earth who can divide her love among 10 children and each child still have all her love."

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111


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From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

The longer I live...the sweeter life grows

April 20, 2021



Ah, sunset! It must be one of the favorite times of the day for photographers and for couples going for a romantic walk. Actually, for just about all of us. I've had the privilege to see the sun sinking beautifully into the horizon of the Atlantic Ocean, the Pacific Ocean, over many of America's majestic mountain ranges, those flaming desert sunsets, and even from many parts of this world. It just doesn't matter where you are on this planet, sunset is just plain beautiful.

Beautiful sunrises! But sooner than any of us can comprehend, life's sun has moved across the sky to the West, and it starts to set.

Sunsets should be beautiful, right? Sadly, for many people who are beginning to see the sun of their life move slowly but surely toward sunset, their sunset isn't very beautiful. In the years when you have so much to give, when every day should count more than ever, too many of us actually become uglier as we get older.

I am of the opinion that the older we get -- the sweeter we ought to become.

Oh, we've all seen it - the older person who is often complaining, self-pitying, demanding. Honestly, it's not very pretty. The older some of us get, the more we can - if we let ourselves - become people who are bitter, picky, mean-spirited. That's the word that describes some folks as their sun moves toward sunset. And self-absorption? That's ugly at any age!

Yes, our later years can have their share of physical pain, disappointed dreams, financial strain, grievous losses, frustrating limitations, and even hurtful neglect. We can't choose our circumstances, but we can, whatever our age, choose our attitude. We can choose what kind of climate we're going to bring with us wherever we are: selfish or unselfish, gentle or harsh, praising or griping, critical or encouraging.

I recently ready, "I have upheld you since you were conceived, and have carried you since your birth. Even to your old age and gray hairs I am He, I am He who will sustain you. I have made you and I will carry you; I will sustain you and I will rescue you."

I believe that the older you get -- the sweet you ought to get. I have a special friend that reminds me how beautiful each sunset is on a regular basis.

That's why you can say no to the darkness of the sunset years. That's why your sunset can be what a sunset ought to be - unforgettably beautiful.

Old friend Robert said, "Sunset is the opening music of the night. Every sunset brings the promise of a new dawn. It is almost impossible to watch a sunset and not dream."

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111


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From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

Undercover Boss

April 20, 2021



I'm afraid that in our society, we have gotten so caught up in our positions, our notoriety, our image...that we have forgotten how to deal with those that honestly seek our help?

I remember speaking in the schools in Lubbock and a 14-year old girl came up to me to visit. She had already had an abortion...had attempted suicide...and had recently lost her father in death as he was successful with his suicide attempt. There was no standard "speech" to be given to this girl as she was honestly searching for some answers.

I've been watching some re-runs of the show called Undercover Boss. Even those who live in high society, run multi-billion dollar corporations, and don't associate with the common laborer get a reality check regarding those who make this world go around.

If you have never watched it -- each episode features the CEO of one of America's major corporations. As each boss places himself/herself in the shoes of those that work for them -- they not only realize that they can't do even the simple tasks of the company, but they discover the heartaches and challenges of their employees working in the trenches so the CEO can make all of that money.

At some point in the show - the CEO is broken to tears when they hear of the every day struggles of their employees.

We live in a hurting world. No matter where we walk in life - we are constantly running into people who are going through some traumatic times -- especially during this pandemic.

There is a humorous story regarding Henry Ford and Charlie Steinmetz. Steinmetz was a dwarf; ugly and deformed, but he had one of the greatest minds in the field of electricity that the world had ever known. Steinmetz built the great generators for Ford in his first plant in Dearborn, Michigan.

One day - those generators broke down and the plant came to a halt. After others had failed to fix the generators - Ford called Steinmetz. The genius came, seemed to putter around for a few hours, and then threw the switch that put the great Ford plant back in operation.

A few days later - Henry Ford received a bill from Steinmetz for $10,000. Although Ford was a very rich man, he returned the bill with a note. "Charlie, isn't this bill just a little high for a few hours of tinkering around on those motors?"

Steinmetz returned the bill to Ford and wrote: "For tinkering around on the motors - $10. For knowing where to tinker: $9,990. Total: $10,000." Henry Ford paid the bill!

As we go through life -- I am often reminded of those that I call my friends. It may not occur very often, but occasionally I will run into a situation that I don't know how to handle and I will call on one of them to help because they know where to tinker in life that makes things run smooth again.

Old friend Robert said, "True friends are those we can count on that will help us make it through life." Perhaps you will have an opportunity this week to be one of those true friends.

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111


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From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

The second mile in life

April 13, 2021



I am amazed how social media has changed our society. The internet, Email, texting, Instagram, tweeting, etc. has open the entire world at our finger tips.

However, I am convinced that, despite having so many opportunities at our disposal, these things contribute more negatives than positives when looking at the condition of our society.

I believe that is one reason there is so much hate and violence in our country. Every day our phones explode with negativity about others, violence sweeping our country, and hatred from our governmental leaders on both sides of the aisle.

The daily news on television is saturated with the same which makes me wonder what our future looks like for our children and grandchildren?

We’ve lost our minds. Everything is coming apart at the seams. Hatred. Anger. Insane responses. Terrorism. Sex trafficking. Child abuse. Abortion. Senseless murder. Perversion. Gender blending. The list seems endless. The answers seem unattainable.

The world is messed up and there’s no end in sight. The sewer is no longer under the street; it’s on our TVs, computers, and cell phones. I might add, the end of violence won’t come with legislation, curfews, or any other temporary response. It’s safer to walk on the moon than the average city park. We can’t fix America politically. Our democracy, our republic is too corrupt, too far gone, too self-centered for that.

What we’ve failed to grasp is that God is more willing to send revival than we are to receive it. We will try anything and everything but God.

I’m a child of the 1960s. I’ve lived through segregation, integration, marches, violence in the streets, an unpopular war, distrust, rednecks, racists, dead religion, Pharisees, legalism, false hope in politicians, the resignation of a president, the assassination of three national leaders and much more. It was sickening then, and it’s sickening now. What we’ve learned in recent years is that we’ve learned nothing in recent years.

The phase “going the second mile” has found its way into our modern jargon. It has its roots in first-century Palestine. The Romans had conquered much of the known world. One of the marvels of their conquest was a vast system of super highways which they had built to and from their conquered territories. There were over 50,000 miles of these Roman roads throughout the empire. At each mile was a stone marker.

The New Oxford English Dictionary calls them “guide stones.” These guide stones pointed direction, determined distance, warned of dangers and each one of them had the miles to Rome etched upon them. Hence the phrase, “all roads lead to Rome.”

By Roman law a Roman citizen could compel a subject from one of the conquered lands to carry his backpack, or load, for him for one mile, but one mile only.

* Guide Stone #1 - The mandated mile – motivated by law

The first mile is always the hardest. Ask the distance runner for example. But if it were not for the first mile, there would be no possibility of the second mile. We live in a world where many do not even make it to the first mile marker. That is, they do not even do what is required of them at the office, at home, at church, at school, or wherever. The first mile is vitally important. It is what makes us function. It is that which is required of us.

* Guide Stone #2 – the miracle mile – motivated by love

This mile is motivated by love and respect. What is it that separates some from others in the world of athletics? The second mile, doing what is required and then some. What separates some from others in the arts or in education or wherever? It is this principal of the second mile.

You may be required to carry someone's load the first mile. You have the right to stop. But the true act of love for others is going the extra mile when you don't have to. Why not try it?

Old friend Robert said, "The one you help will be grateful and you will have joy in your heart that the world can't give."

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111


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From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

Interesting Stuff

April 7, 2021



Occasionally I find some things that I put in my folder marked "Interesting Stuff." I thought I would share some of my stuff with you today. Hope you find it interesting as well. Here goes!

Q. What do bulletproof vests, fire escapes, windshield wipers, and laser printers all have in common?

A. All were invented by women.

Q. What is the only food that doesn't spoil?

A. Honey

Or how about this stuff?

Many years ago in Scotland, a new game was invented. It was ruled "Gentlemen Only...Ladies Forbidden" and thus the word GOLF entered into the English language.

The first couple to be shown in bed together on prime time TV were Fred and Wilma Flintstone.

Every day more money is printed for Monopoly than the U.S. Treasury.

Each king in a deck of playing cards represents a great king from history:

Spades - King David

Hearts - Charlemagne

Diamonds - Julius Caesar

Clubs - Alexander the Great

In Shakespeare's time, mattresses were secured on bed frames by ropes. When you pulled the ropes the mattresses tightened...making the bed firmer to sleep on. Hence the phrase - "Goodnight, sleep tight."

It was the accepted practice in Babylon 4,000 years ago that for a month after the wedding, the bride's father would supply his son-in-law with all the mead he could drink. Mead is a honey beer and because their calendar was lunar based, this period was called the honey month, which we know today as the honeymoon.

In English pubs, ale is ordered by pints and quarts. So in old England, when customers got unruly, the bartender would yell at them "Mind your pints and quarts and settle down." It's where we get the phrase "mind your P's and Q's."

Many years ago in England, pub frequenters had a whistle baked into the rim, or handle, of their ceramic cups. When they needed a refill, they used the whistle to get some service. "Wet your whistle" is the phrase inspired by this practice.

In the 1400's a law was set forth in England that a man was allowed to beat his wife with a stick no thicker than his thumb. Hence we have "the rule of thumb."

Only two people signed the Declaration of Independence on July 4, John Hancock and Charles Thomson. Most of the rest signed on August 2, but the last signature wasn't signed until five years later.

Old friend Robert said, "Never regret anything that made you smile; die with memories, not dreams and aspire to inspire before we expire."

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111


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From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

"Anybody can answer that!"

March 29, 2021



Albert Einstein was one of the most brilliant men who ever lived. His name has become synonymous with genius. Einstein also had a sense of humor. Like the time he was on a tour of universities explaining his Theory of Relativity.

Since Einstein did not drive, he had to be chauffeured from place to place.

One day, on the way to another speaking engagement, the chauffer said to Einstein, "You know, I've heard this lecture so many times now that I could give it myself."

Einstein responded, "Let's see -- The people at the next university have never seen me before, so they don't know what I look like. Let me put on your uniform and cap, and you can put on my clothes and introduce me as your chauffer. Tell them you are Dr. Einstein, and then you can deliver the speech."

The plan unfolded perfectly. No one recognized Einstein incognito in the chauffer's clothes. The chauffer was introduced as Dr. Einstein and flawlessly delivered the lecture on the Theory of Relativity. Then came the unexpected.

The two conspirators had not thought about the possibility of questions from the audience. When the chauffer finished delivering Einstein's speech, a mathematics professor asked a complicated, technical question involving mathematical formulas and language the chauffer did not understand.

The chauffer was equal to the situation, however. After the question, the chauffer responded, "Sir, the solution to that problem is so simple. I am really surprised you would ask me to answer it. Anybody can answer it. In fact," he suggested, "I'm going to ask my chauffer to come up here and answer it."

Sometimes there are questions that come at us in life that no one else can answer except us. As someone once said, "Life is hard by the yard -- but a cinch by the inch."

As we prepare for the upcoming Easter celebration, may we turn to the One who can provide life's answers. Even the most difficult of questions can be answered by the One who made us and knows us better than anyone. Perhaps you will find some answers to some questions that you have been longing to know. Your willingness to follow Him in complete obedience is the key!

Old friend Robert said, "Easter is a time when God turned the inevitability of death into the invincibility of life."

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111


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From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

When our brain goes into neutral

March 22, 2021



I think all of us would characterize ourselves as pretty intelligent, logical thinking people. We may not be the smartest individuals on the planet as compared to those who scale the IQ level to the genius rating, but, for the most part, we feel that we are at least above average.

Ever have those moments when you wonder if you have the IQ of a chimpanzee??? I think we all have had those times where we scratch our heads and say to ourselves, "What was I thinking?" Of course, we certainly wouldn't begin to write down those moments in our diary of stupidity for fear that someone might find our moments of weakness as grounds for the padded rooms in a mental hospital.

I recently ran into one of those who posed an interesting question to me. I stopped to get a vanilla ice cream cone. I won't tell you where, but I was taken back when, after I ordered the cone, the young lady asked, "Will that be for here or to go?" Duh! What difference does it make?

One of the unique things about the world wide web is being able to find moments in other people's lives who have gone into neutral -- lost their sense of common sense -- which allows us to elevate our intelligence, even if for just a few minutes.

With that thought in mind, perhaps the following will make your feel a little smarter. Or will it?

A woman recalled: "This week, my phone went dead and I had to contact the telephone repair people. They promised to be out between 8:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. When I asked if they could give me a smaller time window, the pleasant gentleman asked, "Would you like us to call you before we come?" I replied that I didn't see how he would be able to do that, since our phones weren't working. He also requested that we report future outages by email. I asked him, "Does YOUR email work without a telephone line?"

A man stated, "I live in a semi-rural area. We recently had a new neighbor call the local township administrative office to request the removal of the Deer Crossing sign on our road. The reason: 'too many deer were being hit by cars' and he didn't want them to cross there anymore."

A mother shared: "My daughter went to a local Taco Bell and ordered a taco. She asked the person behind the counter for minimal lettuce." He said he was sorry, but they only had iceberg lettuce."

A co-worker observed, "I work with an individual who plugged her power strip back into itself and for the life of her couldn't understand why her system would not turn on."

Standing on the corner, "The stoplight on the corner buzzes when it's safe to cross the street. I was crossing with an intellectually challenged co-worker of mine when she asked if I knew what the buzzer was for. I explained that it signals blind people when the light is red. Appalled, she responded, "What on earth are blind people doing driving?"

Sales clerk protects card user, "I was signing the receipt for my credit card purchase when the clerk noticed I had never signed my name on the back of the credit card. She informed me that she could not complete the transaction unless the card was signed. When I asked why, she explained that it was necessary to compare the signature I had just signed on the receipt. So I signed the credit card in front of her. She carefully compared the signature to the one I had just signed on the receipt. As luck would have it, they matched."

Do you have any duh moments to share? Would love to hear from you.

Old friend Robert said, "Everyone has the right to be stupid, but there are some who abuse the privilege."

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111


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From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

Pet Peeves

March 8, 2021



Last week -- I wrote a column regarding pet peeves. Some let me know that they related to those things that make you want to scream.

As I was doing some shopping at Wal-Mart last week -- I was reminded once again of some of the things that cause me to really scratch my head and wonder, "What are they thinking?"

It bothers me to see people who pick up items at Walt-Mart in one area of the store and then decide, along the way, that they don't want an item and, instead of taking it back where it belongs, they just dump it on another isle. How dumb and/or lazy is that? I don't think Oreo cookies belong near the lawnmowers. Or how about those people who begin checking out at Wal-Mart and start dumping items near the cashier because they changed their mind or they didn't have enough money to pay for everything?

I observed over 25 carts completely stacked up with items. The girl at Wal-Mart said, "These are all items left throughout the store. We have to spend at least six hours of our shift going through all these items. We place the non-perishable items back on the shelf and the meat, frozen items go in the trash. What a waste!"

When you get in line at Wal-Mart or your local grocery store -- do you see the sign that says 20 items or less? It is there for a reason. They mean that if you have 20 items or less -- get in that line. If you have more than 20 items -- there are other lanes for you!

I recently had only six items and as I approached the 20 items or less register -- Pa and Maw Kettle were in front of me with a truck load of groceries. They looked at me and then turned around to proceed to check out. Would have been nice if they had allowed me to go before them since I met the item requirement, but that didn't happen.

One of these days - the cashier will actually direct these "can't count the items in my grocery basket" to the right check out lane.

If I were a cashier, I would ask those who can't count, "Which 20 of all these items do you want?" When they say all of them -- I would direct them to the line that doesn't say, "20 items or less!"

Here are a few other notables you might have experienced.

  • People talking on their newest iPhone in while using Food Stamps.

  • Rappers who thank God at awards ceremonies after their music [if you can call it that] just used every vulgar word you can think of.

  • People that pop and smack their chewing gum.

  • Those who crack their knuckles.

  • Those who crunch ice.

  • Those who crunch pork skins.

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111


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From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

Pet Peeves

March 8, 2021



Do you have any pet peeves? Of course you do! We all do! It is those things that get under our skin. It may be some little thing, but it is still an irritation.

Sometimes you don't know you have a certain pet peeve until it raises its ugly head and all of a sudden -- there it is.

One of my pet peeves is people who can’t make up their mind at a fast food restaurant. When it’s their turn to order, after staring at the menu for several minutes, they say, “Ummm, let me see what you got.” I feel like yelling, “They’ve got hamburgers and chicken. Which one do you want?”

I have many other pet peeves: Telemarketers who call during mealtime. Drivers who pull out in front of you and then only travel 10 miles an hour. People who use the last sheet of toilet paper and don’t replace the roll. People who are late. People who let their dogs jump on you and laugh, saying, “Fi-Fi likes you.” People who crack their knuckles while talking to you.

Grocery shopping carts with a bad wheel. You will find these at Wal-Mart. Drivers who make U-Turns where they are not allowed to. People who go the wrong way in a parking lot. People who chew with their mouth open. People who use the phrase "110%" (or even more % sometimes).

People sitting at a red light and continuing to sit there when the light turns green because they're on their cell phone. Finding the end of the program hasn't recorded after sitting riveted for almost two hours. Waitresses who call you "hun" or "babe."

Young people with baggy pants that expose their underwear. Remake of classic movies that are totally unnecessary. A well done steak or burger when it was ordered "medium."

Have you ever wondered if God has any pet peeves? Of course I would only be guessing. Here are a few that could be a possibility. He might say:

 • People who go around saying, “God told me.” I’m not sure these name-droppers even know what I sound like. I get blamed for lots of things I had nothing to do with.

 • Only hearing from people when they’re up to their armpits in trouble. Yes, I’m glad they call on me. But don’t they realize I want to walk with them through the good times, too?

 • Preachers who make my Word boring. No wonder so many don’t want to listen. Some of those sermons even put me to sleep.

 • Famous people who thank me when they get an award. I scratch my head when I see someone get up and thank me for making movies that break all 10 of my commandments.

 • Unopened Bibles people carry around for years. You might as well carry around the Yellow Pages. At least that book has coupons in the back.

 • People who use my name and follow up with a reference to a structure that holds back water.

 • People I’ve blessed with money who spend it on themselves. I guess they don’t realize I could have as easily placed them in a third-world country.

Old friend Robert said, "My pet peeve is when someone blows their nose in your presence and then proceeds to look at what just filled their tissue/handkerchief."

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111


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From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

"None of the Above"

March 2, 2021



I can't remember the names of all seven of Snow White's dwarfs, but I don't feel bad about that. I do remember one - Grumpy. Actually I've heard that the Grumpy shirt is one of Disney's big sellers. I might know why. Grumpy is kind of the mood of a whole lot of people these days.

I mean, you know, when you take just the state of politics in America, most people don't seem to be very excited about any potential future candidate. We've got one group who wants us to stop spending money, and then there are some who want people to stop making money. And there are some who don't like what the President's doing, and some don't like what Congress is doing. And a lot of people aren't impressed with any of the politicians so far. "Hello, Grumpy!"

See, if there was a "none of the above" choice on the ballot, he might just win. I mean, it doesn't matter whether you're in America or many other countries of the world, we're just hunting for a leader who won't let us down; who can actually do something about the baffling tangle of problems we have. And it's not just politicians who've let us down. Sometimes parents fail us...a leader that we've looked up to disappoints us...betrays us.

I remember seeing the movie "Brewster's Millions" with Richard Pryor who was going to inherit $300 million dollars. But he had to spend $30 million in 30 days without retaining any assets. He had to be dead broke. If he did that, the $300 million would be his.

Someone suggested he run for a political office. His popularity was very high, but he couldn't afford to win so he ran on the ticket "None of the Above." He didn't win, he spent the $30 million and inherited the $300 million.

Remember several years ago when a plane crashed in the Hudson River? And we thought it was just going to be massive carnage. Instead we saw "the miracle on the Hudson." This jetliner's engines had been totally disabled, it looked like there was going to be a tragic crash. But their captain, Captain "Sully" Sullenberger, was a veteran fighter pilot, airline pilot and crash investigator; probably one of the few pilots who could bring them in safely. And he was the one at the controls.

I've been on some flights where I wish I could have picked the captain in the cockpit. I've never been able to pick the pilot for my flight, but I got to pick the pilot for my life. He's the one Pilot who can bring you in safely...no matter what happens.

Old friend Robert said, "A good leader takes a little more than his share of the blame, a little less than his share of the credit."

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111


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From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

Does this really matter?

February 22, 2021



Almost every day, I play a game with myself that I call "time warp." I made it up in response to my consistent, erroneous belief that what might get me all worked over something that was really important wasn't really important at all.

Late last month, I got a call from my mortgage company asking about my house payment that wasn't late for March. I ask, "Why are you calling me now?"

The guy said, "I am calling because you are almost late."

I said, "I've been paying my mortgage for 32 years with no late or missed payments and you are calling me on a Sunday afternoon to let me know I might almost be late?"

Needless to say, I ask him never to call again unless I am 30, 60, or 90 days late!

When I hung up the phone I thought to myself, don't get so worked up. You will never talk to that guy again. What difference will it make a year from now?

I then went back to watching golf.

Once I really thought about it...I allowed someone to interfere with my peaceful afternoon.

I began years ago deciding that I wasn't going to allow someone to ruin my day.

I realized that many of the people that cross our path in a negative way are people we will never see again. So why let them have their time to ruin your day?

Actually, we all do this on an occasional basis.

We go shopping and someone gets our parking spot. Instead of getting so worked up, go to another spot and say to yourself, "You are not going to ruin my day."

Get self out of the way and begin to think of how you might bring a smile to someone else.

One way I have been blessed is going through the drive-thru at Chick-fil-A and paying for the car behind me while telling the person at the drive-thru to tell the car behind me to "pass it on."

Try it! It will make your day!

Old friend Robert said, "You are never strong enough that you don't need the help of someone else."

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111


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From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

The inner groans of life

February 9, 2021



I have been reading a book entitled: Surviving Friendly Fire. The entire premise of the book is about how those who are suppose to love us the most, are usually the ones who hurt us the worst. There are also examples of how our own soldiers, who are fighting to protect our freedom, have lost their lives when killed by their own and not the enemy.

It is true in communities when people, who are supposed to be friends and neighbors, engage in cruel and hideous acts of hurt through their words and actions.

Lewis Smedes said, "If you live long enough, chances are you'll be hurt by someone you counted on to be your friend...When we invest ourselves in deep personal relationships, we open our souls to the wounds of another's disloyalty or even betrayal."

We are living in a day of "soul stabbing" wounds which can be far more painful and devastating than "body stabbings." Even in America -- we have those invisible, internal injuries no surgeon in the world could detect. Wounded, broken, bruised, many a person cries out with groans from the innermost being.

It now is evident outwardly in the political arena.

You may be "groaning" because you've been misunderstood, or treated unfairly. The injury is deep because the blow landed from someone you trust and respect...someone you are vulnerable to...someone you love.

It is possible that your pain was inflicted by the stabbing of someone's tongue. An individual who said things that are simply untrue. Perhaps the comment was made only in passing, but it cut into the tissue -- it pierced you deeply. The person who made the remark will never know. But you will...as you endure...keep quiet...and bleed.

And then it dawned on me as I wrote these words and thoughts.

Do you know what a scar is? It is a wound that has been healed. We all have scars in life. Some are outwardly seen due to a physical injury. Others are scars that are on the inside that no one can see, but you know they are there. But instead of remaining as open wounds -- they represent wounds that have been healed leaving only the scar to remind you of your healing.

Some currently live with scars brought on by past failures. Sometimes when you're alone the past slips up from behind like an ocean wave and overwhelms you. The scab is jarred loose. The wound stays inflamed and tender and you wonder if it will ever go away. Although it is unknown to others, you live in the fear of being found out....and rejected.

Tucked away in a quiet corner of every life are wounds and scars. If they were not there -- we would need no Physician. Nor would we need one another. Something to at least think about.

Old friend Robert said, "The tongue has no bones, but it is strong enough to break a heart. So be careful with your words!"

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111


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From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

Beginning another year

February 2, 2021



It is hard to believe that we have begun another year which is good because it beats the alternative. It also means that we are going to be another year older and perhaps a year that we might learn some new lessons in life.

I received the following from a former high school classmate that I thought you might enjoy.

Great truths that little children have learned

1) No matter how hard you try, you can't baptize cats.

2) When your Mom is mad at your Dad, don't let her brush your hair.

3) If your sister hits you, don't hit her back. They always catch the second person.

4) Never ask your three-year old brother to hold a tomato.

5) You can't trust dogs to watch your food.

6) Don't sneeze when someone is cutting your hair.

7) Never hold a Dust-Buster and a cat at the same time.

8) You can't hide a piece of broccoli in a glass of milk.

9) Don't wear polka-dot underwear under white shorts.

10) The best place to be when you're sad is Grandpa's lap.

Great truths that adults have learned

1) Raising teenagers is like nailing Jell-O to a tree.

2) Wrinkles don't hurt.

3) Families are like fudge...mostly sweet, with a few nuts.

4) Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground.

5) Laughing is good exercise. It's like jogging on the inside.

6) Middle age is when you choose your cereal for the fiber, not the toy.

Great truths about growing old

1) Growing up is mandatory; growing old is optional.

2) Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

3) When you fall down, you wonder what else you can do while you're down there.

4) You're getting old when you get the same sensation from a rocking chair that you once got from a roller coaster.

5) It's frustrating when you know all the answers but nobody bothers to ask you the questions.

6) Time may be a great healer, but it's a lousy beautician.

7) Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.

The four stages of life

1) You believe in Santa Claus.

2) You don't believe in Santa Claus.

3) You are Santa Claus.

4) You look like Santa Claus.

May 2021 be your greatest year ever for your business and family. We are facing a new year with many uncertainties, but good friends can help us face whatever obstacles that we may encounter.

Old friend Robert said, "Kindness, kindness, kindness. I want to make a new year's prayer, not a resolution. I'm praying we would be kind to one another."

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111


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From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

Instant Replay in 2020...

January 25, 2021



Instant Replay in the NFL is a common occurrence during a game. In fact, now it is a part of our state championship games in high school at AT&T Stadium in Arlington. Speaking of Instant Replay.

If you had a chance to change (replay) some things that you did in 2020 -- what would you change?

Everyone goes through the process of making New Year's resolutions and we joke about how they won't last very long. The truth is -- we may joke about various resolutions, but deep in our heart, we long to change or adjust some attitudes, actions, or habits that we don't like about ourselves that have caused us to replay over and over in our minds. Here are a few changes that you might consider:

Be more patient

How easy it is to be impatient at the store, in traffic, or in our daily activities in life. I am always amazed at how people get flustered. Those who get ticked because the waiter/waitress doesn't immediately take their order when an eatery is busy. Those who huff and puff when the lines are too long at Wal-Mart, Kroger's, or Randall's or wherever you choose to shop.

Be more forgiving

We know we should and we know it is right, but there are a lot of people carrying a heavy load of revenge around their neck. Bitterness and resentment is not healthy -- nor is it right. Yet -- it seems that so many live with an "I'll get even with you" kind of attitude. One thing I have come to realize is that when you forgive, you not only set someone free, but you yourself are set free. It is like paying off a debt. You no longer owe anything.

Be more giving

When you forgive -- I believe that the natural response is to then give. In life - there are the "givers" and the "takers." I can tell you that giving is a lot more fun and it isn't limited to just Christmas. I have met the takers in life and they are no fun to be around -- they always move on to someone else to fleece them.

Recently, someone sent me the following sayings that I wanted to pass on to you.

1. The best way to get even is to forget.

2. Feed your faith and your doubts will starve to death.

3. Unless you can create the WHOLE universe in six days, then perhaps giving "advice" to God, isn't such a good idea!

4. Sorrow looks back, worry looks around, and faith looks up.

5. Standing in the middle of the road is dangerous. You will get knocked down by the traffic from both ways.

6. Words are windows to the heart.

7. A skeptic is a person who, when he sees the handwriting on the wall, claims it's a forgery.

8. The mighty oak tree was once a little nut that held its ground.

9. The tongue must be heavy indeed, because so few people can hold it.

10. To forgive is to set the prisoner free, and then discover the prisoner was you.

11. You have to wonder about humans, they think God is dead and Elvis is alive!

12. It's all right to sit on your pity pot every now and again. Just be sure to flush when you are done.

13. You'll notice that a turtle only makes progress when it sticks out its neck.

Old friend Robert says, "A New Year’s resolution is something that goes in one year and out the other."

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111


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From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

Making a difference

January 19, 2021



The older we get the faster time goes by -- or so it seems. In our childhood days, we thought Friday would never get here. Now -- every time we turn around -- it is Friday.

Texting, E-mailing, tweeting, etc. has been a major form of communication in today's world. Year after year we seem to be living in a world of avoidance. The less we have personal contact with someone -- the better.

Occasionally I share with my kids what it was like growing up when I was their age. I remember my parents telling me about the great depression, walking two miles in the snow to school (when they lived in Arizona), five-cent cup of coffee, etc. And, like my kids, I just rolled my eyes.

The other day, I was explaining to some young kids that when I grew up, cars didn’t have seat belts, power steering or air-conditioning. Our first vehicle with automatic shift was a big deal. When we did get a television, it was black and white. We received only three channels, and those broadcast only a portion of the day. Instead of texting, we were talking. The longer I spoke to these kids about the things I’ve seen, the more amazed they were that I survived such primitive conditions.

I am truly amazed at the world of texting. Some of these kids text faster than a speeding bullet. They can send a dozen text messages out before I can thump out one text.

The text messages I receive often come in text language, a shorthand used for messaging. Many of these abbreviations have become common knowledge like BFF, “Best Friend Forever” or FYI, “For Your Information.”

Did you know text language has also been adopted by business people? AFK stands for “Away From Keyboard” and BIL stands for “Boss Is Listening.” Soon, we will reach the point where a young man will propose to his future wife by texting, “WILUMryME?”

As the Baby Boomers move into retirement age, a new phenomenon is emerging. These budding senior adults have picked up on the new technology and developed some of their own text messaging shorthand. A young person’s texted “LOL” means “Laughing Out Loud.” But for a senior adult, the same letters mean “Living on Lipitor” and FYI means “Found Your Insulin.”

A young person would use “M8” to mean “mate,” but for a senior adult, it stands for “Metamucil at Eight.” “GTG,” a popular way to end a text message, means “Got To Go.” For a senior adult, however, it means “Going to Gastrologist.” “TTYL” normally means “Talk To You Later,” but to a senior adult, it translates as “Talk To You Louder.” In text language, A3 means “Anytime, Anyplace, Anywhere” but for a senior adult, it signifies “Arthritis, Angina, Ailments.” Of course, “BTW” stands for “By The Way,” but now it can also mean “Bring The Wheelchair.”

It saddens me that in this day of text messaging, e-mail and Facebook, we have forgotten the art of touch. Being touched is one of our most basic needs.

Make up your mind that you will be a positive influence in the lives of others. Won't you join me? And that my friends is more than FYI. It’s AMOF (A Matter Of Fact).

Old friend Robert said, "If you love life, don't waste time, for time is what life is made up of."

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111


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From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

The value of another

January 12, 2021



Every once in a while, I watch a program on our local Public Broadcasting Station (PBS) called "Antiques Roadshow." This show features a group of appraisers who crisscross America. When they come to your town, you bring in your junk and they tell you its value.

Of course, every episode has its twists and turns. One person discovers that his valuable, pre-Civil War antique was made in China and sold at last year's state fair. Another brings in an object that cost a quarter at his next-door neighbor's garage sale, only to learn that it is worth thousands.

During one show, a man in a pair of overalls stood behind a simple table. Now, I want you to know that I have nothing against overalls. When I was growing up in rural America, everyone wore them, and I still own a pair. When the appraiser asked, "Where did you buy this table?" the man in the overalls replied roughly, "Garage sale."

"And what about this table caught your eye?" asked the appraiser. "It was the same size as my television. I had been looking for a table to hold it. This one has done the job for the last 10 years."

The appraiser wore a shocked expression. "Do you know what kind of table this is?" he asked. The man in the overalls replied, "Yes. It is a television table."

Quietly, the appraiser began explaining that this was a one-of-a-kind piece, dating back to the time of Paul Revere. The man in the overalls didn't look too impressed. Next, the appraiser told him that in fact, this looked like a table that Paul Revere himself had made. Turning it over, the appraiser showed the man some markings and other aspects of construction. The more the appraiser talked, the more excited he got. The man in overalls just listened.

Finally, the appraiser could no longer hold in his excitement as he exploded. "In all my years of studying antiques, I have never seen a table like this. I have called other appraisers to verify, and we concur. You have the only known Paul Revere table in existence! What do you think of that?"

The man in the overalls looked up just long enough to say, "It fits my television."

The appraiser continued, "If I sold this at an antique auction, I would start the bidding at $150,000 - and there's no telling how high it would go. Now, what are you going to do?"

The man in the overalls looked up from his table just long enough to say, "I am talking it back home so I can sit my TV on it." He wasn't persuaded by the table's value or history. It held his television perfectly. That was all that mattered.

I can't fault the man in the overalls. I think that we, too, forget the value of those in our lives. We see them for what they can do for us, instead of who they are.

It is funny how that age changes our perspective on life. When we are younger -- we want to accumulate things. When we get older -- after we have accumulated things -- we find that they don't really make us happy.

I don't expect to find I have Paul Revere's table holding up my television -- and that is OK. But I am thankful for those that are closest to my heart...those who are worth more than any table. Those who can never be replaced with the things of this world.

Old friend Robert said, "I believe in one thing -- that only a life lived for others is a life worth living."

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111


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From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

There is nothing to fear

March 16, 2020



There was a time in American history that the American people were living in fear. They weren't afraid of an enemy invading our country. The fact is, the invasion was from within. Fear of poverty. Fear of disease. Fear of death. Fear of failure.

And what a variety of fears there are today. There have been some 500 various forms of phobias, that is, things that bring dread or terror into our lives identified. Some of the top fears are:

  • Glossophobia: the fear of pubic speaking.
  • Acrophobia: the fear of heights.
  • Aerophobia: the fear of flying.
  • Claustrophobia: the fear of confined spaces.
  • Agoraphobia: the fear of open spaces.
  • Brontophobia: the fear of thunder/lightening.
  • Necrophobia: the fear of death.
  • Howard Hughes was so afraid of germs that he used four boxes of tissue paper everyday, wiping off everything he touched.
  • Evil Knievel, the dare devil stuntman was afraid of airplanes.
  • Augustus Caesar was afraid to sit in the dark.

We all face the fear of failure. It is part of our nature. Franklin D. Roosevelt addressed the nation with these words, "There is nothing to fear, but fear itself."

Now it seems -- we have been hit by the fear of the Coronavirus.

Just look and see how people have responded to stocking up on toilet paper! All the medical professionals have told us that the meds we might take in response to the Coronavirus does not mean the need for toilet paper -- yet rumor had it that we were running out of TP in America.

I would suggest that we need to make a friend of our fear. Many books written on the subject of fear are nothing more than delightful little treaties on how to get rid of fear, or how to master or conquer our fear.

What most people haven't figured out is that fear is not our enemy, an evil and harmful emotion to be completely driven out.

Fear is an elemental emotion, a part of our native equipment, God-given; therefore, like any other normal emotion, it has a constructive, essential purpose. Our real problem is not how to get rid of it, but how to use it to our advantage.

The animals are aware of its purpose. There is no animal without fear. For some, like the deer and the rabbit, fear is the sole weapon of defense; it is not an enemy, but an ally. Startle a rabbit and what happens? The sense of impending danger starts a nervous reaction which, quicker than you can say, "rabbit," shoots a powerful stimulant from his glands into his running apparatus, and he is gone with the wind...gone with the speed he could never manage without the stimulus of fear. Same with a deer.

Or, as someone has said of the emotional reactions of certain people, "If you don't tell them enough they go fishing; if you tell them too much they go crazy."

Old friend Robert said, "Faith is believing a thing is so, even though it is not so, in order for it to be so."

In short, fear should be the stimulus to build your faith. We need to use this Coronavirus concern as a time to increase our faith and trust in the living God. There is a God in heaven who knows exactly what is going on and instead of looking solely to the government for answers -- our eyes and prayers ought to be turned heaven-ward. Try it -- you might like it! And you might find that peace will come into your heart.

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111


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From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

Lessons to learn from the pearl

February 24, 2020



If we would all be honest -- most of us would not list patience as one of our strengths. In fact -- our lack of patience is the main source of life's irritations. Wouldn't you agree?

Traffic jams, long lines, crying babies, misplaced keys, interruptions, deadlines, incompetence, high prices, flat tires, stuck zippers, nosy neighbors, late planes, and the list could go on. All are a source of things that cause us to become irritated.

Like the sign I recently saw that read: "I am planning to have a nervous breakdown. I have earned it...I deserve it...I have worked hard for it...and nobody's going to keep me from having it!"

If we lived in a zoo, the sign outside our cage might read: "Human Being - Watch out for outbursts!" Some have come to believe that irritations in life were meant to teach us some valuable lessons. Think about the oyster and pearl.

Pearls are the product of pain. For some unknown reason, the shell of the oyster gets pierced and an alien substance - a grain of sand - slips inside. On the entry of that foreign irritant, all the resources within the tiny sensitive oyster rush to the spot and begin to release healing fluids that otherwise would have remained dormant. By and by the irritant is covered and the wound is healed -- by a pearl.

No other gem has so fascinating a history. It is the symbol of stress -- a healed wound...a precious, tiny jewel conceived through irritation, born of adversity, nursed by adjustments. Had there been no wounding, no irritating interruption, there could have been no pearl. Some oysters are never wounded...and those who seek for gems toss them aside, fit only for stew.

If it weren't for irritations, we'd be very patient, wouldn't we? But it is through stress in life that potentially makes us stronger people so that we can learn to adjust to our circumstances.

I learned some great lessons when I had Bacterial Meningitis that almost took my life in 2006. There is not a day that goes by that I don't give thanks for another opportunity to be alive and involved in the lives of others. And I continue to learn many life lessons.

My first grandchildren came in the form of twins. Cooper and Kayla entered the world at 2.4 lbs. They are now 13-years-old. Heathy, energetic, and totally normal. While they had a stressful beginning -- they have grown to be perfectly normal teenagers to add stress to their mom and dad.

Their early struggles have been a constant reminder that there is a power much greater than we are and we are grateful for those who have stood in the gap on behalf of our little jewels.

This week -- I will see my eighth grandchild come into the world. Not sure what it is as of this writing -- but either way -- I'm asking for a healthy child after the stress of labor.

Old friend Robert said, "No wonder those who have referred to a heavenly home has as its entrance pearly gates!"

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111


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From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

Pet Peeves come to light

January 28, 2020



As I was doing some shopping at Wal-Mart last week -- I was reminded of some of the things that cause me to really scratch my head and wonder, "What are they thinking?"

It bothered me to see people who pick up items at Walt-Mart in one area of the store and then decide, along the way, that they don't want an item and, instead of taking it back where it belongs, they just dump it on another isle. How dumb and/or lazy is that? I don't think Oreo cookies belong near the lawnmowers.

Or how about those people who begin checking out at Wal-Mart and start dumping items near the cashier because they changed their mind or they didn't have enough money to pay for everything?

I observed over 25 carts completely stacked up with items. The girl at Wal-Mart said, "These are all items left throughout the store. We have to spend at least six hours of our shift going through all these items. We place the non-perishable items back on the shelf and the meat, frozen items go in the trash. What a waste!"

When you get in line at Wal-Mart or your local grocery store -- do you see the sign that says 20 items or less? It is there for a reason. They mean that if you have 20 items or less -- get in that line. If you have more than 20 items -- there are other lanes for you!

I recently had only six items and as I approached the 20 items or less register -- Pa and Maw Kettle were in front of me with a truck load of groceries. They looked at me and then turned around to proceed to check out. Would have been nice if they had allowed me to go before them since I met the item requirement, but that didn't happen.

One of these days - the cashier will actually direct these "can't count the items in my grocery basket" to the right check out lane.

I like what one cashier said to a customer who had a filled basket of groceries that far exceeded the 20 item limit.

She asked, "Which of these 20 items do you want?" The customer said, "All of them." The cashier said, "Then you need to go to the register that will take all of these items. This register is reserved for 20 items or less only."


Here are a few other notables you might have experienced.

  • People talking on their newest iPhone while using Food Stamps.
  • Rappers who thank God at awards ceremonies after their music [if you can call it that] just used every vulgar word you can think of.
  • People that pop and smack their chewing gum.
  • Cracking your knuckles.
  • Crunching ice.
  • Crunching pork skins.

Old friend Roberts says, "It is irritating when people can't complete a sentence without saying "like".

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111


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From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

Phrases that are still spoken today

January 14, 2020




Perhaps you have seen the following:

*$ = Starbucks

121 = One to One

14AA41 = One for All and All for One

2B or not 2B = To Be or Not to Be

2B@ = To Be At

The list could go on so I think you get the idea. We are seeing a generation who is very smart, but they are condensing the English language.

Thank goodness that there are still some phrases that are still around today -- many of which started back in the 1930's which is before my time just for your information.

I thought I would give some of you old timers [including me] some of the phrases that I am thankful are still being used today.

This is just a small list that seems to work for a lot of things.

You can be free as a bird, fresh as a daisy, go off half-cocked, go hog-wild, fly off the handle, blow your top, or be on cloud-nine.

You can call a spade a spade, have a change of heart, decide not to beat around the bush, vow not to bite the hand that feeds you, vow not to burn your bridges behind you, cry over spilt milk, or muddy the water.

Criticism can roll off us like water off a duck's back. We can be tickled pink. Life can be easy come, easy go, but now and then we reach the end of our rope, for crying out loud. Sometimes we find ourselves between a rock and a hard place.

Sometimes we can't win for losing. At other times life is a piece of cake.

Or how about these?

"He got it all done in one fell swoop."

"I'll get that done in the twinkling of an eye."

"The early bird catches the worm."

"The squeaky wheel always gets the grease."

"He who hesitates is lost."

"This weather ain't fit for man nor beast."

"A rolling stone gathers no moss."

"He thinks he's got the whole world by the tail."

"That's old hat."

"I want to get back to my old stomping grounds."

"He went out on a limb."

"You'll have to paddle your own canoe."

"He's a real pain in the neck."

Those are just a few to remind us that the old is still around. If you can think of some more -- send them to me!

Old friend Robert says, "Remember, curiosity killed the cat."

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111




From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

I shouldn't be alive!

December 30, 2019



Seriously! I shouldn't be alive.

I started thinking about the difference between the world I grew up in and my seven grandchildren -- five, of which, are four years old and under.

I grew up in a generation that didn’t have childproof bottles, cabinets or electrical sockets. We didn’t have car seats, seatbelts or airbags. I rode a bike without a helmet, hung upside down from trees, jumped off roofs, climbed hay bales and rode in the bed of a pickup without adult supervision.

What were my parents thinking?

We ate white bread with real butter and two out of our three daily meals included desserts with no artificial sweeteners. We didn’t worry about our weight or cholesterol because we left the house early in the morning and worked and played until dinnertime.

Back then, home was not a place to come and lock yourself into, but a place to leave and explore the world. We would ride our bikes into town to a drugstore, where we would get a Coke made with real sugar, and ride back home.

The neighborhood was filled with kids and I played until I heard my mom yell out the back door, "David, it's time to come home!"

If it was hot and we were outside, we wouldn’t bother going inside for a drink. We just drank from the garden hose, paying no attention to the rubbery taste.

Think of it: we didn’t know what bottled water was, and yet we managed to live. My parents would let us play in the rain and eat snow ice cream. I ate bugs (not always intentionally), picked up snakes, carried a knife, climbed barbed wire fences, and it seems like I always had a BB gun.

We would play army and instead of using play guns -- we would use our BB guns. When we said "Stick'em up!" -- we meant it or you'd get shot with the BB gun.

Don’t get me wrong. I’m glad we have more awareness of safety nowadays, but I wonder if we’ve become more safety-conscious than family-minded. The difference between when I was growing up and what I see in today’s society is that, back then, we did things together.

We worked together, played together and even watched TV together. I remember us watching Gunsmoke every Saturday night together as a family. The Andy Griffith Show was one of my all-time favorites. We went to church as a family, serving God together.

Of course, Roy Rogers and the Lone Ranger were great shows. Roy and Dale always had some life lessons to teach us from the Bible. Imagine!

Today -- it seems that cell phones occupy most of our time. If you don't believe that -- look around when you go out to eat and see what the average family is doing at the table while waiting on their food order.

We need to see the importance of spending time with our children. One of these days, before you know it, the children will be grown and gone and have children of their own. And you will find yourself saying, "Where did all the time go?"

Old friend Robert said, "Know that you are the perfect age. Each year is special and precious, for you shall only live it once. Be comfortable with growing older."

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111




From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

Angels are around -- especially this time of the year

December 16, 2019



Occasionally - someone sends me something that I find very touching and think it is worth sharing. We have just celebrated Thanksgiving which should put us in the giving spirit to bless others as Christmas time approaches. Perhaps this experience by a Hospice physician from Denver, Colorado will make you more aware of the needs of others.

He writes: "I just had one of the most amazing experiences of my life, and wanted to share it with my family and dearest friends:

I was driving home from a meeting this evening about 5:00 p.m., stuck in traffic on Colorado Blvd., and the car started to choke and splutter and die - I barely managed to coast, cursing, into a gas station, glad only that I would not be blocking traffic and would have a somewhat warm spot to wait for the tow truck. It wouldn't even turn over. Before I could make the call, I saw a woman walking out of the "Quickie Mart" building, and it looked like she slipped on some ice and fell into a gas pump, so I got out to see if she was okay.

When I got there, it looked more like she had been overcome by sobs than that she had fallen; she was a young woman who looked really haggard with dark circles under her eyes. She dropped something as I helped her up, and I picked it up to give it to her. It was a nickel.

At that moment, everything came into focus for me: the crying woman, the ancient Suburban crammed full of stuff with three kids in the back (one in a car seat), and the gas pump reading $4.95.

I asked her if she was okay and if she needed help, and she just kept saying "I don't want my kids to see me crying," so we stood on the other side of the pump from her car. She said she was driving to California and that things were very hard for her right now. So I asked, "And you were praying?" That made her back away from me a little, but I assured her I was not a crazy person and said, "He heard you, and He sent me."

I took out my card and swiped it through the card reader on the pump so she could fill up her car completely, and while it was fueling, walked to the next door McDonald's and bought two big bags of food, some gift certificates for more food, and a big cup of coffee. She gave the food to the kids in the car, who attacked it like wolves, and we stood by the pump eating fries and talking a little.

She told me her name, and that she lived in Kansas City. Her boyfriend left two months ago and she had not been able to make ends meet. She knew she wouldn't have money to pay rent January 1, and finally in desperation had finally called her parents, with whom she had not spoken with in about five years. They lived in California and said she could come live with them and try to get on her feet there.

So she packed up everything she owned in the car. She told the kids they were going to California for Christmas, but not that they were going to live there.

I gave her my gloves, a little hug and said a quick prayer with her for safety on the road. As I was walking over to my car, she said, "So, are you like an angel or something?"

This definitely made me cry. I said, "Sweetie, at this time of year angels are really busy, so sometimes God uses regular people."

It was so incredible to be a part of someone else's miracle. And of course, you guessed it, when I got in my car it started right away and got me home with no problem. I'll put it in the shop tomorrow to check, but I suspect the mechanic won't find anything wrong."

Sometimes the angels fly close enough to you that you can hear the flutter of their wings.

If you have a special experience this Christmas season - drop me a line and let me know. Others need to be blessed as well. It is my prayer that God will bless you in a special way this Christmas. Don't forget the reason for the season!

Old friend Robert said, "“He who has not Christmas in his heart will never find it under a tree.”

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111





From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

The spoiled over 30 crowd

September 24, 2019



When I was a kid, adults used to bore me to tears with their tedious diatribes about how hard things were when they were growing up; what with walking twenty-five miles to school every morning...uphill BOTH ways yadda, yadda, yadda.

And I remember promising myself that when I grew up, there was not way I was going to lay a bunch of stories on my kids about how hard I had it and how easy they've got it.

But now that I'm way past the age of 30 with four kids of my own who are married and with six grandchildren with two more in the oven, I can't help but look around and notice the youth of today.

They really do have it easy! I mean, compared to my childhood, they live in a Utopia!

And I hate to say it, but the kids today don't know how good they've got it!

When I was growing up, we did have The Internet. If we wanted to know something, we had to go to the Library and look it up ourselves, in the card catalog.

Ask a young person today to give you the definition of a Library or the function of a card catalog.

There was not Email! We had to actually write somebody a letter---with a pen---and put a stamp on it.

The we had to walk across the street and put it in a mailbox and it would take a week to get there.

There were no MP3's or iPod. You wanted to listen to music -- you had to hitchhike to the record store and get your music there.

We didn't have fancy Call Waiting! If you were on the phone and somebody else called -- they got a busy signal -- that's it!

And we didn't have fancy Caller ID boxes either! When the phone rang -- it was pot luck who might be calling. Cell phones didn't exist! No texting either.

It could be your school, your mom, your boss, a collection agency -- you just didn't know. You had to pick it up and take your chances!

We didn't have any fancy Sony PlayStation, Madden Football, video games with high-resolution 3-D graphics!

We had Atari 2600! With games like Space Invaders and Asteroids. Your guy with a little square! You actually had to use your imagination. And there were no multiple levels or screens -- it was just one screen forever!

Of course -- my much earlier years provided us with the Pinball machines. Achieve certain points to get a free game. Use the flippers to keep the steel ball in play -- but bump the machine too hard and you would see your game end with a TILT sign.

Like anything else in life, we found a way to gain an advantage. We would pick up the Pinball machine at the lower end -- place the two legs on our feet to level out the machine, put in a quarter, and keep the steel ball from shooting down as fast as it normally would so you could rack up dozen's of free games.

Only problem was that your toes really hurt with the weight of the machine on the top of your feet.

With the early video games -- they just kept getting harder and harder and faster and faster until you died. Just like LIFE!

When you went to the movie theater, there was no such thing as stadium seating. All the seats were the same height! If a tall guy or some old woman with hat sat in front of you and you couldn't see -- you would have to move to find another seat.

Television was a real blast. All three channels and no channel changer. You actually had to get up and change the channel to watch another program. But with only three networks -- ABC, CBS, and NBC -- changing channels wasn't a regular occurrence.

There was no on screen menu so you had to buy a TV Guide at the grocery store when checking out. There was no such thing as ESPN or Cartoon Network.

Cartoons came on Saturday morning. Sometimes as you were getting ready for school during the week you could start off your day watching Popeye or the Roadrunner.

Microwaves? You have to be kidding. If you wanted to heat up your food -- you would use the stove. If we wanted popcorn -- we had to use that stupid Jiffy Pop thing and shake it over the stove forever like an idiot.

My dad bought a Kirby vacuum cleaner -- yeah the one the salesman going door-to-door sold him.

My children have the robotic vacuum cleaner that is plugged into the wall -- leaves the charger and vacuum's their home while they are at work -- and when they return home -- they have a clean floor. What a tough life!

The thought just occurred to me. What are my children going to tell their children about how tough they had it growing up. Too bad I won't be around to see it.

I know -- they will start with the story of how they had to walk five miles to school in the snow in Houston. Right!

Old friend Robert said, "You know you are old when you are the same age as the Emmy Awards."

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111





From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

Statistics influence our lives

August 9, 2019



Have you noticed that when commercials are trying to sell you something these days, they start quoting statistics? It's as though numerical data has suddenly become irrefutable evidence that you need to buy a particular product.

If you don't heed statistical wisdom, you will suffer from ingrown toenails, endure the heartache of psoriasis and be rejected by your mother for having bad breath.

One recent commercial was emphatic about using their product, but then gave you the side effects if you do. I have always been careful to listen to those other things that could happen to you if you choose a particular product.

For instance, you use a product to help your arthritis, but the side effects include diarrhea, headache, earache, sore feet, dizzy spells, ringing in the ears, and itching. It might be worth it to just deal with the arthritis.

The other day, I read that a 10-year, $3 million government survey revealed that three-fourths of the people in America make up 75 percent of the population. Duh!

Of course, you know that when 81 percent of people use the word "government" and "statistics" in the same sentence, they are seeking to prove a point.

That same government survey, in fact, said that 51 percent of the people are in the majority. I even read the other day that 87.333 of all statistics are improperly done.

Here are some statistics about being an American:

* Your chance of getting hemorrhoids: 25 to 1

* Your chance of experiencing an IRS audit: 175 to 1

* Your chance of catching a baseball at a Major League game: 563 to 1

* Your chance of picking a four-leaf clover on the first try: 10,000 to 1

* Your chance of becoming a professional athlete: 22,000 to 1

* Your chance of being hit by lightning: 576,000 to 1 (A friend of mine was hit by lightning, an act that simultaneously melted his zipper and made him a local hero)

* Chances of your son dating a supermodel: 88,000 to 1

Did you know that only 7 percent of women trust their husband to do the laundry correctly?

Half the people (50 percent) who attend a movie sneak in snacks to avoid concession stand prices.

Twenty-two percent of people leave a glob of toothpaste in the bottom of the sink after brushing their teeth. This includes those who spray water all over the sink and the mirror when they spit out the toothpaste making a deplorable mess. It is as if a miniature tsunami has invaded your bathroom.

Three out of four keep your money in rigid denominational order.

Ninety percent use an alarm clock to get up in the morning.

Sixteen percent have forgotten your anniversary at one time or another.

Old friend Robert said, "By the way - 50 percent of you will go checkout the bathroom sink for the glob of toothpaste."

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111





From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

2019 Football media guide ads now being accepted

July 30, 2019



The 2019 high school football season is approaching for Pearland and Dawson High Schools.

It is also time for area businesses to plan on placing an ad in the football publications. Since I produce the media guides for Dawson and Pearland, there is still space available in these award-winning full-color publications for the 2019 football season.

For the fifth consecutive year -- both media guides finished in the top three in the nation at the National High School Sports Media Publications Contest with Pearland finishing No. 1 and Dawson placing No. 2.

Both publications can be seen at www.reporternewssports.com -- just click on a cover and turn the pages.

Each school manages 100 percent of the money and they can account for every dime spent in these ventures. Plus - each school has a first-class media guide to present to their fans and visiting teams.

If you are interested in placing an ad in one or both of these media guides, please give me a call or E-mail me and I will send you the details of what you need to do.

The Pearland community needs to realize that they can support their individual teams while knowing that all of the money stays at home since this money goes to support the scholarship fund for each booster club. Every check is made out to the booster clubs of each school and they control all finances without any funny business.

I can be reached at 281.997.6800 or 713.449.7474 or E-mail me at drdaviddavis@yahoo.com to let me know of your interest.

Here are the following E-mails to let us know of your interest in placing a business ad.

Also -- if you are a parent and want to place a personal ad for your son or daughter in any of the two football media guides -- you can use the same E-mail addresses to contact us for the information sheet for each submission. Make plans now as space is limited. Don't wait until the final deadline on Wednesday, August 7.

You can also find the forms at:

www.dawsoneagles.org

www.pearlandoilers.com

Old friend Robert said, "Texas has four seasons: winter, spring, summer, and football."

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111





From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

The 'Pause Button' of Life

July 23, 2019



My mother, who turned 92 back in March, used to make a statement that I didn't understand until the last several years.

She would say, "The older you get, the faster time goes by." Wouldn't you agree?

I remember someone else who remarked, "You better enjoy your kids while they are young because, before you know it, they will be grown and gone."

That is also a true statement as my youngest son, Landon Davis, celebrates his 31st birthday on April 29. He will also celebrate his sixth wedding anniversary with his lovely wife Valerie on April 27. They now have two handsome boys, Graham (3), and Owen (9 mos).

It seems like only yesterday when he was preparing for his senior season for the Pearland Oilers. Pearland finished 10-1 that year with their only loss to North Shore in the first-round of the playoffs. Landon was named as an All-District tight end.

My youngest daughter, Lexis, and her husband, Kenneth, are now expecting their second child, a boy, that will be named Kenneth Levi Bort to go with one-year-old daughter, Leighton Joy.

I think my oldest daughter, LeJoy, and her husband, Larry, are realizing how swiftly life is moving as their twins will be 12 in September while little Abby is also growing up.

I am certainly realizing it as Pops tries to do things with them, attend their special activities, and cherish each time they spend the night at the house.

One thing I did when they were first able to start to recognize things is to have a 'magic drawer' filled with various things like hair clips, Pez Dispensers, little cars, stickers, etc.

Each time Cooper and Kayla come over, they know they will get something out of the 'magic drawer.'

Now I have four more grand-critters -- Graham, age 3, Abby, age 3, and Leighton, age 1, Owen, 9 mos, with a new one on the way. It won't be long until they get to experience Pop's 'magic drawer.'

I'll try to put on the pause button and take a mental picture of their excitement of what they are able to take home with them.

I am so thankful today for the precious moments of life. If only we could slow it down for a while. Or even pause. Maybe you feel the same way! I think of the song by Simon and Garfunkel when they sang, "Slow down, you move too fast. You gotta make the morning last."

Take time to pause your button of life. You will be glad you did!

Old friend Robert said, "If you have your health, if you have people in your life to love, then you are blessed. Slow down and enjoy the simple things in life."

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111





From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

If Only

July 16, 2019



I am currently reading a book entitled: "If Only!" by David A Seamands. The whole premise of his book is dealing with those times in our lives when we have said, "If only I had done this or that. If only I had made better choices."

I read the story of a young man who reflected about opportunities that his dad had in life.

He wrote, "My dad was approached by the founders of ServiceMaster, which is this of course, huge multi-million dollar corporation in America. And they were neighbors, and they came to him when they were just starting and they said, 'Hey, would you like to get in on the ground floor and help us get started?' He said, 'Well, guys, why don't you just go clean your carpets, um, no thanks.'"

Well, that wasn't all. Another one of their neighbors was a man named Ray Croc. You might recognize that name; he was the founder of McDonald's! He came to dad and said, "Would you be interested? We're opening our fourth little hamburger thing called McDonald's Golden Arches. Would you like to get in on the fourth store?" "No, I'm not into hamburgers." He came back to him another time and said, "Hey, it's going pretty well. You know we're opening our seventh one. Would you like to get in on it?" "No, I'm not interested."

How many times do you think about, wow, what did I miss? I guess you just add those to the list of life's "if onlys," huh? Of course, you've got your own list. Maybe not opportunities to make a million, but a lot of missed opportunities of things in life in general.

This man in the story missed some golden opportunities with golden arches. But that was only to make money. We're talking about the opportunity to touch lives here. And it happens in the little golden moments that don't seem that important at the time. "If only I had taken the time."

Perhaps we might think about some of the simple things that occur in life. Those situations that happen in an instance and if you don't take advantage of that inward tug of your heart -- you know it will pass you by and you will say, "If only..." but it is too late.

My friend Bill Dahlkamp and I recently met for lunch. A man walked in and sat in the booth behind us...he appeared to be homeless.

When we left - we paid for his meal anonymously. It was an "If only..." moment that we didn't want to miss.

I hope you aren't one of those, "If I coulda, woulda, shoulda" type person. Those people miss out on blessing others as they walk through life.

There are times that certain moments happen in life that will never come your way again. When that inner churning takes place -- do what you know you should do and never look back. I promise it is worth the risk.

If you don't -- you might miss the greatest blessing or experience of your life and there never will be a second chance. Your life may change forever and you will never be the same again.

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111





From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

Paying respect to our flag and national anthem

June 24, 2019


 

One thing I am learning now about being a grandfather (Pops) to six critters -- is that I am in a position to teach them some things like I taught my children (their parents).

Recently, my three-year-old grandson, Graham, was telling me some things he was learning in Daycare. While we were talking, I asked him if they were teaching him the Pledge of Allegiance to our flag?

He shook his head no which caused me to wonder why that wouldn't be on their list of things to teach the young children. I happen to believe that patriotism is something that should be taught in America at a very young age.

Whether I am in the press box during football season, courtside at a basketball game, or standing out in the open for baseball, softball, track, etc. -- I always stand and place my hand over my heart during the presentation of the colors and the playing of the Star-Spangled Banner.

It is something I have done for almost 65 years beginning in a catholic kindergarten in Duncan, Oklahoma. When I began first grade, we were taught to recite the Pledge of Allegiance while putting our right hand over our heart. Each and every day, we did this from the first grade till I was a senior in high school.

Patriotism was engrained into our lives and only when I left home to live on a college campus did I see my patriotism challenged -- due in part to the Vietnam War.

I was at the age where I could have been drafted to go to Vietnam. Going to college and making good grades allowed me to stay at home, though I had some high school classmates who served our country in Vietnam only to return home in body bags.

There was Bobby Frost and Patrick Robirds who gave their life for our freedom. Another classmate, Keith Werner, returned home severely wounded where he lived a short time and then died.

Recently, one of our Pearland elder statesman, who graduated from Pearland High School, approached me following the national anthem at a sporting event. He asked, "Do some of our adults and students not know how to honor our flag and national anthem?"

He went on to say, "I was taught to stop talking, take off your hat [if you were wearing one], place your hand over your heart, face the flag, and stand at attention at the playing of the national anthem. Where is the respect?

According to some research, here is the proper etiquette regarding our flag and national anthem.

The US Code (Titles 4 and 36) specifies four circumstances for rendering the hand-over-heart salute:

  1. When the US flag is raised or lowered
  2. When the US flag is carried past in a review or parade
  3. When reciting the pledge of allegiance
  4. When the national anthem is played

The saluter should face the flag in all cases. If the national anthem is played when the flag is not displayed, the saluter should face the source of the music.

Whether you agree or not, keep something in mind. There have been thousands of men and women who have given their lives so you and I could stand for a few moments and give respect to our nation's flag and anthem. In essence -- we are also giving respect to them and their sacrifice of dying for our freedom.

Sure, I know we have players in the NFL that kneel during the national anthem in protest of something. But consider this -- 99.9 percent of them have never nor will they ever put on a military uniform and put their lives on the line for our freedom. In past days -- we had athletic heroes who exchanged their ball uniforms for military uniforms and went to war in service of our country...only to return to be sports heroes again. Ted Williams is one who immediately comes to mind.

The next time you attend an athletic event and they play the national anthem, please stop talking, take off your hat, stand at attention with your hand over your heart, say a prayer for the men and women who are serving our country in the military, and be reminded that our freedom has been paid for with the ultimate sacrifice -- the life of a fellow American.

Old friend Robert said, "This country will not be a good place for any of us to live in unless we make it a good place for all of us to live in."

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111





From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

Undercover Boss

June 24, 2019



I'm afraid that in our society, we have gotten so caught up in our positions, our notoriety, our image...that we have forgotten how to deal with those that honestly seek our help?

I remember speaking in the schools in Lubbock and a 14-year old girl came up to me to visit. She had already had an abortion...had attempted suicide...and had recently lost her father in death as he was successful with his suicide attempt. There was no standard "speech" to be given to this girl as she was honestly searching for some answers.

Recently, I was watching a rerun of Undercover Boss. This show has revealed that even those who live in high society, run multi-billion dollar corporations, and don't associate with the common laborer get a reality check regarding those who make this world go around.

If you have never watched it -- each episode features the CEO of one of America's major corporations. As each boss places himself/herself in the shoes of those that work for them -- they not only realize that they can't do even the simple tasks of the company, but they discover the heartaches and challenges of their employees working in the trenches so the CEO can make all of that money.

At some point in the show - the CEO is broken to tears when they hear of the every day struggles of their employees.

We live in a hurting world. No matter where we walk in life - we are constantly running into people who are going through some traumatic times.

There is a humorous story regarding Henry Ford and Charlie Steinmetz. Steinmetz was a dwarf; ugly and deformed, but he had one of the greatest minds in the field of electricity that the world had ever known. Steinmetz built the great generators for Ford in his first plant in Dearborn, Michigan. One day - those generators broke down and the plant came to a halt. After others had failed to fix the generators - Ford called Steinmetz. The genius came, seemed to putter around for a few hours, and then threw the switch that put the great Ford plant back in operation.

A few days later - Henry Ford received a bill from Steinmetz for $10,000. Although Ford was a very rich man, he returned the bill with a note. "Charlie, isn't this bill just a little high for a few hours of tinkering around on those motors?"

Steinmetz returned the bill to Ford and wrote: "For tinkering around on the motors - $10. For knowing where to tinker: $9,990. Total: $10,000." Henry Ford paid the bill!

As we go through life -- I am often reminded of those that I call my friends. It may not occur very often, but occasionally I will run into a situation that I don't know how to handle and I will call on one of them to help because they know where to tinker in life that makes things run smooth again.

Old friend Robert said, "True friends are those we can count on that will help us make it through life. Perhaps you will have an opportunity to be one of those true friends."

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111





From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

Difference between athletic and personal trainers

June 17, 2019



One issue that has been raised among some parents is what is the difference between an "athletic trainer" and a "personal trainer?"

Matt Thomas and Jill Flowers of Pearland HS, Megan Duncan of Friendswood HS, and Chris Shaddock of Dawson HS are "athletic trainers."

The National Athletic Trainers Association defines both positions.

An athletic trainer is a person who meets the qualifications set by a state regulatory board and/or the Board of Certification, Inc., and practices athletic training under the direction of a physician.

Certified athletic trainers:

  • Must have at least a bachelor's degree in athletic training, which is an allied health profession.
  • Must pass a three-part exam before earning the ATC credential.
  • Must keep their skills current by participating in continuing education.
  • Must adhere to practice guidelines set by one national certifying agency.

Daily Duties of Certified athletic trainers:

  1. Provide physical medicine and rehabilitation services.
  2. Prevent, assess, and treat injuries (acute and chronic).
  3. Coordinate care with physicians and other allied health providers.
  4. Work in schools, colleges, professional sports, clinics, hospitals, corporations, industry, military.

Personal Trainers

  • May or may not have higher education in health sciences.
  • May or may not be required to obtain certification.
  • May or may not participate in continuing education.
  • May become certified by any one of numerous agencies that set varying education and practice requirements.

Bottom Line: For all parents and student-athletes, Dawson, Pearland, and Friendswood High Schools have some of the best "athletic trainers" that may be found anywhere. They fulfill all certification requirements and participate in continuing education programs to be at the top of their service to our kids.

The student-athletes are in good hands with these athletic trainers who stay in constant contact with qualified physicians and surgeons who have a specialty in athletic medical treatment.

Parents and coaches don't have to worry about their kids being hooked up with a drug dealer. My hats off to Matt Thomas, Jill Flowers, Megan Duncan, and Chris Shaddock. Your kids are in good hands with these athletic trainers.

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111





From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

Dad's Rules

June 10, 2019



Several years ago -- I wrote a column entitled, "Ten Rules for Dating My Daughter" which was humorously received -- except one guy in Friendswood who took me seriously...and then E-mailed me saying he hoped he wasn't the only one who found my humor in bad taste. He was the only one that I know of while I received several E-mails (mainly from men) who let me know they got a good laugh.

It was during that same time that I received a humorous E-mail letting me know "Dad's Rules" which I found very funny...perhaps you will too!

We always hear "the rules" from the mother's side. Now here are the rules from dad's side.

With Father's Day approaching, please note... these are all numbered "1" ON PURPOSE!

1. Learn to work the toilet seat. You're a big girl. If it's up, put it down. We need it up, you need it down. You don't hear us complaining about you leaving it down.

1. Sunday sports. It's like the full moon or the changing of the tides. Let it be.

1. Shopping is NOT a sport. And no, we are never going to think of it that way.

1. Crying is blackmail.

1. Ask for what you want. Let us be clear on this one: Subtle hints do not work! Strong hints do not work! Obvious hints do not work! Just say it!

1. Yes and No are perfectly acceptable answers to almost every question.

1. Come to us with a problem only if you want help solving it. That's what we do. Sympathy is what your girlfriends are for.

1. A headache that lasts for 17 months is a problem. See a doctor.

1. Anything we said six months ago is inadmissible in an argument. In fact, all comments become null and void after 7 days.

1. If you think you're fat, you probably are. Don't ask us.

1. If something we said can be interpreted two ways and one of the ways makes you sad or angry, we meant the other one.

1. You can either ask us to do something or tell us how you want it done. Not both. If you already know best how to do it, just do it yourself.

1. Christopher Columbus did not need directions and neither do we.

1. ALL men see in only 16 colors, like Windows default settings. Peach, for example, is a fruit, not a color. Pumpkin is also a fruit. We have no idea what mauve is.

1. If we ask what is wrong and you say "nothing," we will act like nothing's wrong. We know you are lying, but it is just not worth the hassle.

1. If you ask a question you don't want an answer to, expect an answer you don't want to hear.

1. When we have to go somewhere, absolutely anything you wear is fine...Really.

1. Don't ask us what we're thinking about unless you are prepared to discuss such topics as baseball, the shotgun formation, or monster trucks.

1. You have enough clothes.

1. You have too many shoes.

1. I am in shape. Round is a shape.

1. Thank you for reading this. Yes, I know, I have to sleep on the couch tonight; but did you know men really don't mind that? It's like camping out.

Old friend Robert said, "The nature of impending fatherhood is that you are doing something that you’re unqualified to do, and then you become qualified while doing it. Every father should remember one day his son will follow his example, not his advice."

HAPPY FATHER'S DAY!

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111





From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

It's that time of the year again

June 3, 2019



When I was younger, my two oldest children, Lincoln and LeJoy would always notice men who wore bermuda shorts with black socks up to their knees while wearing sandals, street shoes, or white tennis shoes. These were usually men who were 50 years old and above. They knew I would never think about wearing such a combination, but it became a household joke.

As they got older and two more critters came along 10 years younger than each of them, they passed on their observations to their younger siblings, Landon and Lexis. It was one thing that they have always noticed men dressed like that every time we were out shopping or at the grocery store. It is quite another for them to think their dad would dress that way.

I mentioned this to my youngest daughter last week that since I am getting older and Father's Day is just around the corner, perhaps I need to start thinking about re-designing my wardrobe when she and her family go out with me in public. You know -- bermuda shorts, bright colored shirt, knee-high black socks, and white tennis shoes.

She looked at me and said, "I'm not going to go with you if you dress that way. That's not cool. I don't want to be seen with you looking like that. We might run into one of our friends."

So - I guess she is safe as I will stick with my Nike shoes and short white athletic socks with shorts and golf shirt. Actually, I don't think I could ever bring myself to putting on dark socks with shorts. Especially wearing plaid shorts with a striped shirt. Not cool!

But, I was once again reminded that I am getting older.

For years, I have collected dozens of ways that you know you are getting older. Perhaps these new ones will put a smile on your face as you go through the aging process. So - here goes! You know you are getting older when:

  1. You and your teeth don't sleep together.
  2. You try to straighten out the wrinkles in your socks and discover you aren't wearing any.
  3. At the breakfast table, you hear snap, crackle, and pop and you aren't eating cereal.
  4. Your back goes out more than you do.
  5. It takes two tries to get up from the couch.
  6. When your idea of a night out is sitting on the patio.
  7. When happy hour is a nap.
  8. When you're on vacation and your energy runs out before your money does.
  9. You make noises when you sit down and get up.
  10. When all you wanted for your birthday is not to be reminded of your birthday.
  11. When you step off a curb and look down one more time to make sure the street is still there.
  12. Your idea of weight lifting is standing up.
  13. It takes longer to rest than it did to get tired.
  14. Your memory is shorter and your complaining lasts longer.
  15. You sit in a rocking chair and you can't get it going.
  16. Getting 'lucky' means you found your car in the parking lot.
  17. Everything hurts, and what doesn't hurt - doesn't work.
  18. You sink your teeth into a steak and they stay there.
  19. You give up all your bad habits and still don't feel good.
  20. You finally get your head together and your body starts falling apart.

Old friend Robert said, "I bend over to tie my shoe and wonder what else I can do while I'm down there."

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111





From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

An assignment that lasted a lifetime

May 28, 2019



My column on Gia Gardella last week made me think of something I had received several years ago when I was speaking in schools in association with the D.A.R.E. program. Perhaps it will touch your heart as it did mine.

One day a teacher asked her students to list the names of the other students in the room on two sheets of paper, leaving a space between each name.

Then she told them to think of the nicest thing they could say about each of their classmates and write it down.

It took the remainder of the class period to finish their assignment, and as the students left the room, each one handed in the papers.

That Saturday, the teacher wrote down the name of each student on a separate sheet of paper, and listed what everyone else had said about that individual.

On Monday she gave each student his or her list. Before long, the entire class was smiling. "Really?" she heard whispered. "I never knew that I meant anything to anyone!" and, "I didn't know others liked me so much." were most of the comments.

No one ever mentioned those papers in class again. She never knew if they discussed them after class or with their parents, but it didn't matter. The exercise had accomplished its purpose. The students were happy with themselves and one another. That group of students moved on.

Several years later, one of the students was killed in Vietnam and his teacher attended the funeral of that special student. She had never seen a serviceman in a military coffin before. He looked so handsome, so mature.

The church was packed with his friends. One by one those who loved him took a last walk by the coffin. The teacher was the last one to bless the coffin.

As she stood there, one of the soldiers who acted as pallbearer came up to her. "Were you Mark's math teacher?" he asked. She nodded: "yes." Then he said: "Mark talked about you a lot."

After the funeral, most of Mark's former classmates went together to a luncheon. Mark's mother and father were there, obviously waiting to speak with his teacher.

"We want to show you something," his father said, taking a wallet out of his pocket. "They found this on Mark when he was killed. We thought you might recognize it."

Opening the billfold, he carefully removed two worn pieces of notebook paper that had obviously been taped, folded and refolded many times The teacher knew without looking that the papers were the ones on which she had listed all the good things each of Mark's classmates had said about him.

"Thank you so much for doing that," Mark's mother said. "As you can see, Mark treasured it."

All of Mark's former classmates started to gather around. Charlie smiled rather sheepishly and said, "I still have my list. It's in the top drawer of my desk at home."

Chuck's wife said, "Chuck asked me to put his in our wedding album".

"I have mine too," Marilyn said. "It's in my diary."

Then Vicki, another classmate, reached into her pocketbook, took out her wallet and showed her worn and frazzled list to the group.

"I carry this with me at all times," Vicki said and without batting an eyelash, she continued: "I think we all saved our lists."

That's when the teacher finally sat down and cried. She cried for Mark and for all his friends who would never see him again.

The density of people in society is so thick that we forget that life will end one day. And we don't know when that one day will be.

So please, tell the people you love and care for, that they are special and important. Tell them, before it is too late.

Old friend Robert said, "Yes, you can lose somebody overnight, yes, your whole life can be turned upside down. Life is short. It can come and go like a feather in the wind."

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111





From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

She fought till the very end

May 26, 2019



I must be honest with you. I don't always understand why some things in life seem so unfair. I don't understand why bad people hurt others and destroy their lives and don't care if they live another day while really nice, caring people get hit in the face that they have a life-threatening disease when their whole future is in front of them.

This was one of my first thoughts when I received news that Dawson's Giavanna "Gia" Gardella had lost her battle to cancer. Gia was the daughter of Craig and Andrea Gardella.

I have fond memories of her when she was playing softball for the Lady Eagles her senior year. She graduated from Dawson in May of 2018. She started her pursuit of a Bachelor's of Science Degree at Sam Houston State University online in hopes of becoming a Registered Nurse like her mom. However, she was diagnosed with Stage 4 non-Hodgkin's Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma the next month of June. She lost her battle to the disease on May 11, 2019.

Since I do the media guides for Pearland ISD, which includes Dawson HS -- I picked up my 2018 Dawson softball program and there was a beautiful, smiling Gia - No. 9 in your program - No. 1 in your heart.

Each player has their own biographical information in the publication and they answer a series of statements such as:

My favorite food -- in which she answered Chipotle Burritos.

It came as no surprise that Britney Spears was named as her role model.

She had a large selection of favorite snacks such as Twix, Reese's Puffs, Chick-fil-A, What-A-Burger, Raising Cane's, and Hershey's Kisses just to name a few.

One thing was certain -- Gia always had a beautiful smile and made others smile.

During her battle with this heinous disease -- she got to throw out the first pitch at an Astros game while flashing that winsome smile that everyone had come to recognize as her trademark in life. But deep down inside -- she really wished she had been throwing out the first pitch at a New York Yankees game. No offense to the Astros, but the Yankees was her team.

While she might have been in physical pain -- she greeted everyone with great joy and hugs. She freely shared her love and affection to her teammates and coaches -- even a few days before she left this earth. She did the same with her family.

Cancer cannot rob you of your joy

There are things that can be taken from you, but only if you allow it. Cancer is a deadly disease and it robs people of life -- even those who are really just getting started.

A thief may steal your possessions - but they can't steal your happiness.

Sickness can cripple you physically -- but it can't take away your spirit.

You see - happiness is an inside job.

I have a sign on my wall with the following sentence:

"There is no outward circumstance -- no outward situation -- that can affect my inward surrender to God."

This serves as a daily reminder to me after I survived Bacterial Meningitis in 2006. A day never goes by without giving thanks and being reminded that I am living an "unfinished life."

Gia Gardella may be a life removed from earth - but not from our hearts. While she may be physically gone -- she will never be forgotten. Even for those who barely knew her.

Cancer ravaged her body, but not her spirit. It sapped her energy, but couldn't touch her soul. Maybe that was her final lesson she left for her family and friends who all have special memories of such a beautiful young lady. Her joy of living will remind us all to live life each day to the fullest.

We will miss you Gia! You were a blessing to me.

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111





From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

The remote control society

May 14, 2019



"Where's the remote? Has anyone seen the remote?" Ever heard that question? Sure you have. We live in a society that can't function without a remote control.

Ever notice when the battery gets weak in the remote that instead of putting in new batteries -- we just mash the buttons harder and slap the remote around?

Sure - I am old enough that there was no such thing as a remote for the television set. That's right! We actually had to get up and walk to the television to change the channel to either NBC, CBS, or ABC.

In fact - we didn't have a color TV growing up. My dad fell for the plastic color screen that you taped over the TV screen. That's right - green at the top, red in the middle, blue at the bottom -- which meant people had green faces, red clothes, and blue feet. But someone made millions of dollars - probably Ron Popell - the Ronco guy! He went from that to selling you 999 knives for $39.95.

There was no FOX, ESPN, HBO, TV Land, Cartoon Network, MTV, and 140 other channels that are now available.

We settled in on one channel and watched the program. Back in the day it was almost a Saturday night ritual for most homes in America to watch Gunsmoke. Of course we were also attached to Bonanza and the Cartwrights on the Ponderosa. I was always fascinated with the map that burned up on the screen at the start of the show.

On Monday night came the television series when David Jansen starred as Dr. Richard Kimble in the hit series The Fugitive (ABC, 1963-1967). That's right - they chased him for five years before the final episode to discover his innocence.

The remote control society has developed to say a lot about who we are as a society and as individuals.

We love to be in control, to push all the buttons, to mute others when needed, to turn others up or down. There is something about this modern television device that says a lot about us.

We live in a culture that is increasingly opposed to what we believe and one that is busy at work to re-educate young minds away from traditional moral values.

I'm amazed as I watch Judge Judy in the afternoon and see parents sue their children for a few hundred dollars. No wonder the Judge often says, "America has gone down the toilet!"

What does this say about our society? Here are three truths that speak about our remote control society.

I. Principle #1 — don’t give in — be resistant

The tendency is to give in to the culture around us and to go its way.

II. Principle #2 — don’t give up — be consistent

The tendency is to be overcome, overrun by the culture and simply to give up on trying to uphold basic principles of living right. It is not enough to simply be resistant; we must also be consistent.

III. Principle #3 — don’t give out — be persistent

We need to engage our culture and make a difference in this world. Why is it that we so often give in, or give up, or give out? Could it be because of the remote control syndrome, that tendency we have to want to control everything?

Persistence is the key to everything we do in life. Persistence. perfection. patience. power. Prioritize your passion. It keeps you sane.

Old friend Robert said, "Your hardest times often lead to the greatest moments of your life. Keep going. Tough situations build strong people in the end."

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111





From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

A few helpful tips

May 6, 2019



On occasion -- I receive some helpful tips that are useful in every day life. On rare occasions - I receive some tips that find their way quickly in File 13 -- if you know what I mean!

Some tips I receive I label: The noise you make when you're eating soup.

However - there are some great tips that you might not have ever heard -- so I want to share some from my File of Great Tips!

Did you know?

  • Peel a banana from the bottom and you won't have to pick the little 'stringy things' off of it. That's how the primates do it.
  • Take your bananas apart when you get home from the store. If you leave them connected at the stem...they ripen faster. (Saw a new gizmo at Wal-Mart that you can hang your bananas on to support this theory).
  • To really make scrambled eggs or omelets rich add a couple of spoonfuls of sour cream, cream cheese, or heavy cream in and then beat up the eggs.
  • Heat up leftover pizza in a non-stick skillet on top of the stove, set heat to med-low and heat until warm. This keeps crust crispy - no more soggy microwave pizza.
  • Easy Deviled Eggs: Put cooked egg yokes in a zip lock bag. Seal, mash till they are all broken up. Add remainder of ingredients (mayo, mustard, chopped pickles) re-seal, keep mashing it up thoroughly -- cut the tip of the baggy, squeeze mixture into egg white. Just throw away the bag when finished.
  • Here's a gardening tip: Start putting in your plants, work the nutrients in your soil. Wet newspapers, put layers around the plants overlapping as you go. Cover with mulch and forget about the weeds. Weeds will get through plastic, but not through wet newspapers.
  • To reduce static cling -- pin a small safety pin to the seam of your slip or inside your pants and you will not have a clingy skirt, dress, or pants.
  • Hate foggy windshields? Buy a chalkboard eraser and keep it in your glove box in your car. When the windows fog - rub with the eraser...works better than a cloth.

Here are some words of wisdom:

  • No one ever chokes to death swallowing their pride.
  • He who burns his bridges better be a great swimmer.
  • It's hard to soar like an eagle when you're dressed like a turkey.

Old friend Robert said, "We are judged by what we finish - not by what we start. If you win - say little; If you lose - say less."

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111





From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

Calling for tech support

April 30, 2019



A few weeks ago -- I had a problem with AT&T and had to call one of those 800 numbers. We live in a day and time where we never talk to a real person -- at least initially. We have to go through the recorded voice list. You know -- press 1 or 2 or 3, etc. depending on your need.

Whoops! I forgot -- you had to say English to let the recorded voice know what language you wanted before you started punching numbers.

I think the term is called "outsourcing" which means "sourcing out." It's a trend that started years ago in manufacturing, which is a business term that means "making things." It has been many years -- but there was a time when Americans actually made things called "products" right here in America.

I remember, as a kid, some things were "Made in Japan" -- and we laughed at that and considered it a cheap product. Not any more!

After we stopped making things, America became a "service economy" which is a business term meaning "an economy where it is virtually impossible to get service." But now even our service industries are being outsourced. Take for example, "technical support" which is the department you call when you're having a technical problem and need to be placed on hold. Today, when you finally get through to a human, he or she is often in a different country.

Which brings me back to my call for "tech support" for AT&T.

There is good news and bad news.

The good news is: The foreign tech support people are smart, educated and eager to help, and they speak English. My call to AT&T was finally answered by someone in India.

The bad news is: The Indian spoke in such a way that you understand only every fifth word.

My call to AT&T was forwarded to someone in India who was sincere in their attempt to help me. The only word I consistently understood him saying was "David." I felt like the dog in the Far Side cartoon who's getting a stern lecture from his master, but the only thing the dog understands is his own name.

Tech Support Guy: David, wokm tolied stsport, David. Mgiym nabith semime?

Me: The serial number? You want the seriel number?

Tech Support Guy: Simeym dolsith, David. Beimine laimkk, David?

Me: What?

Tech Support Guy: Sit, David! Lie down! Roll over! Speak David!

We might as well accept it folks! Outsourcing is here to stay. And it's happening EVERYWHERE, including industries that would surprise you.

When you order a hamburger from What-a-Burger, the person who's taking your order is located in the Philippines. Your hamburger is physically cooked by workers in Argentina, the beef capital of the world, then transmitted almost instantaneously to the U.S. via a high-speed Digitized Beef Patty Line (DBPL).

When you take a commercial airline flight, the plane is actually being controlled from India by a 10-year-old girl holding a remote-control stick in one hand and a lollipop in the other. The "pilot" in the front of your plane is a retired security guard whose sole responsibility is to notice when the plane starts shaking and make an announcement that you are experiencing turbulence.

I have decided to start outsourcing my column by foreign humor workers, who, rest assured, are highly trained. You will notice no dropoff in quality as you continue to enjoy the wacky hmogrins of djlvllly iffht hvsmileupdsy not making this up rikgllt ailtods is a good name for a football team.

Old friend Robert said, "You never change your life until you step out of your comfort zone; change begins at the end of your comfort zone."

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111





From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

Lessons we must learn in life

April 23, 2019



My youngest daughter, Lexis, will turn 28 on April 27. Now that she is a wife and mother of a one-year-old -- it is fun to watch her as she is on the other side of life when it comes to dealing with a beautiful little girl.

Over the past several years -- all of my four children are seeing the challenges I had as a parent. With six grandchildren -- the lessons of life continue. The difference is that my children now have a different teacher.

One day, a teacher gave her class a test. She listed the first part of some famous sayings, asking the students to fill in the rest. The responses were varied as well as humorous. Here are some of the more interesting answers.

    * You can't teach an old dog new . . .math.

    * The pen is mightier than the . . .pigs.

    * An idle mind is . . .the best way to relax.

    * A penny saved is . . .not worth much.

    * Two's company, three's . . .the Musketeers.

    * Where there's smoke, there's . . .pollution.

    * Children should be seen and not . . .spanked or grounded.

    * A rolling stone . . .plays the guitar.

    * A bird in the hand is . . .a real mess.

    * It's better to light one candle than to . . .waste electricity.

    * It's always darkest before . . .I open my eyes.

    * You have nothing to fear but . . .homework.

    * If you can't stand the heat . . .don't start the fireplace.

    * If you lie down with the dogs . . .you'll stink in the morning.

    * The squeaking wheel gets . . .annoying.

    * We have nothing to fear but . . .our principal.

    * I think, therefore I . . .get a headache.

    * Early to bed and early to rise . . .is first in the bathroom.

    * There is nothing new under the . . .bed.

    * The grass is always greener . . .when you leave the sprinkler on.

    * Laugh and the whole world laughs with you, cry and . . .you have to blow your nose.

    * Laugh and the world laughs with you, cry and . . .someone yells, "Shut up!"

Well - perhaps today's young people have a little different perspective on life than us older folks. But it doesn't hurt to take a look back and realize that some of the greatest lessons we learned in life came from the simple times of life.

But one thing should never change and that is our appreciation for those that we love the most. Those who are there for us no matter what. But being loved has a greater importance.

Old friend Robert said, "My scars tell a story. They are a reminder of times when life tried to break me, but failed. They are markings of where the structure of my character was welded."

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111





From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

Down to one string

March 26, 2019



The colorful, nineteenth century showman and gifted violinist Nicolo Paganini was standing before a packed house playing through a difficult piece of music. A full orchestra surrounded him with magnificent support.

Suddenly -- one string on his violin snapped and hung gloriously down from his instrument. Beads of perspiration popped out on his forehead. He frowned, but continued to play -- improvising beautifully.

To the conductor's surprise -- a second string broke. And shortly thereafter -- a third. Now there were three limp strings dangling from Paganini's violin as the master performer completed the difficult composition on the one remaining string.

The audience jumped to their feet and in good Italian fashion, filled the hall with shouts and screams -- "Bravo! Bravo!"

As the applause died down, the violinist asked the people to sit back down. Even though they knew there was no way they could expect an encore -- they quietly sank back into their seats.

He held the violin high for everyone to see. He nodded at the conductor to begin the encore and then he turned back to the crowd -- and with a twinkle in his eye, he smiled and shouted -- "Pagani! And one string!"

After that -- he placed the single-stringed Stradivarius beneath his chin and played the final piece on one string as the audience (and the conductor) shook their heads in silent amazement.

"Paganini...and one string!" And, I might add, an attitude of fortitude.

I believe the single most important significant decision I can make on a day-to-day basis is my choice of attitude. It is more important than my past, my education, my successes or failures, fame or pain, what other people think of me or say about me, circumstances, or my position.

Attitude is that "single string" that keeps me going or cripples my progress. It alone fuels my fire or assaults my hope. When my attitudes are right -- there is no barrier too high -- no valley too deep -- no dream too extreme -- no challenge too great.

Yet -- we must admit that we spend a great deal of our time concentrating and fretting over the strings that "snap - dangle - and pop" -- the things that can't be changed -- than we do giving attention to the one string that remains -- our choice of attitude.

Your attitude can make the difference in whether you succeed or fail. If you consistently have a negative attitude -- don't be surprised when those attitudes become the dominant tone of your environment.

So -- when your string snaps and you only have one left -- play like crazy to produce a beautiful symphony of music that will pulsate a melody that encourages and excites the people that you come in contact with each day. It will raise you to new heights of existence.

Old friend Robert said, "When the strings of life snap and you are down to one -- hold that one string and scream out "(Your name) -- and one string!" Then play like crazy!

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111





From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

Simple logic from a simple man

March 18, 2019



I was born and reared in Duncan, Oklahoma -- town of about 25,000 people. Duncan is the home of Halliburton Oil Company. Out of six grade schools -- I went to Will Rogers Elementary. We had other grade schools named after famous people -- Plato - Emerson - Horace Mann - Woodrow Wilson - and Mark Twain. The other schools featured scholars, politicians, and writers. But Will Rogers was a simple man who gave simple answers to life circumstances.

Will Rogers, who died in a 1935 plane crash with Wylie Post, was probably the greatest political sage this country ever has known. He was known for his cowboy movies and his dry humor. He had country logic that usually made good sense. His thought process wasn't the same as most people because he saw life from a different set of eyes.

While there were schools that were named after Will Rogers -- I always felt strange flying out or into Oklahoma City since the airport is named Will Rogers Airport. Never made too much sense to name an airport after a man who died in a plane crash.

However -- I thought you might enjoy the wit of Will Rogers.

1. Never slap a man who's chewing tobacco.

2. Never kick a cow chip on a hot day.

3. There are two theories to arguing with a woman . . .Neither works.

4. Never miss a good chance to shut up.

5. Always drink upstream from the herd.

6. If you find yourself in a hole, stop digging.

7. The quickest way to double your money is to fold it and put it back into your pocket.

8. There are three kinds of men: The ones that learn by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them who have to pee on the electric fence and find out for themselves.

9. Good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment.

10. If you're riding' ahead of the herd, take a look back every now and then to make sure it's still there.

11. Lettin' the cat outta the bag is a whole lot easier'n puttin' it back.

12. After eating an entire bull, a mountain lion felt so good he started roaring. He kept it up until a hunter came along and shot him. The moral: When you're full of bull, keep your mouth shut.

Old friend Robert said, "Too many people spend money they haven't earned to buy things they don't want to impress people they don't like."

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111





From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

My mom just turned 92

March 11, 2019



It is hard to believe that my mom just had her 92nd birthday. She is doing quite well and was glad I could travel to Oklahoma to celebrate with her another year.

We had fun talking about past years and we laughed about ways to know you are getting older.

Over the past several years -- I have a list on "How to know you are getting older."

So -- I have some tidbits regarding getting older that you might find amusing. Just casual observations for those who hate getting old.

  1. I finally got my head together (though that's debatable), now my body is falling apart.
  2. All reports are in. Life is officially unfair.
  3. I started with nothing and I still have most of it.
  4. If all is lost -- where is it?
  5. It is easier to get older than it is to get wiser.
  6. If at first you do succeed - try not to look astonished.
  7. The first rule of holes: If you are in one - stop digging.
  8. I tried to get a life once, but they told me they were out of stock.
  9. I went to school to become a wit, but I only got halfway though.
  10. It was so different before everything changed.
  11. I wish the buck stopped here. I could use a few.
  12. It's not the impact of life that concerns me, it's the sudden stop at the end.
  13. It's hard to make a comeback when you haven't been anywhere.
  14. If God wanted me to touch my toes, He would have put them on my knees.
  15. Never knock on death's door - ring the bell and run (he hates that!).
  16. Lead me not into temptation (I can find the way myself).
  17. When you are finally holding all the cards, why does everyone else decide to play chess?
  18. If you are living on the edge, make sure you're wearing your seatbelt.
  19. There are two kinds of pedestrians. The quick and the dead.
  20. A closed mouth gathers no feet.

    And finally...You know you're getting older when...
  • You're asleep, but others worry that you're dead.
  • Your back goes out more than you do.
  • You quit trying to hold your stomach in, no matter who walks into the room.
  • You are proud of your lawn mower.
  • Your arms are almost too short to read the newspaper.
  • You sing along with the elevator music.
  • You enjoy hearing about other people's operations.
  • You no longer think of speed limits as a challenge.
  • People call at 9 p.m. And ask, "Did I wake you?"
  • The end of your tie doesn't come anywhere near the top of your pants.
  • (My daughter Lexis' favorite) You wear black socks with sandals.
  • Your ears are hairier than your head.
  • You talk about "good grass" and you're referring to someone's lawn.
  • You get into a heated argument about pension plans.
  • You got cable for the weather channel.

Old friend Robert said, "The best advice is to keep breathing -- If you don't - you're a real goner."

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111





From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

A gift to be shared all year round

March 5, 2019



One of the "Happy Days" episodes that I will always remember was when the Fonz made a mistake and was faced with having to say he was sorry to Richie. Each time he would build up his courage to say he was "wrong" -- but as he got ready to say the word his mouth wouldn't allow him to formulate the word -- no matter how hard he tried.

The reason why was that the Fonz was never "wrong" - or so he thought. He did his best to say "wrooooooooongggggg" -- but it never would come out clearly.

The fact is - we all make mistakes and to those we have offended -- we need to seek their forgiveness. When I get myself straightened out - then maybe I will be qualified to help someone else.

I believe I have lived long enough to be qualified to say the following.

Because we all fail at times in life -- I believe it should be our posture in life to be willing to forgive before we condemn. The way the media deals with public figures is astounding in our society today -- as if those same people have never made a mistake. I agree that those in the limelight have a little more responsibility as to their actions, but we all fail no matter the size of our audience.

It seems that we live in a world where forgiveness is not a high priority in life.

Now the entire world has at their disposal social media to express their thoughts no matter how insane some of the thoughts are toward others.

One thing for sure -- forgiveness is on the short list of most people.

Mark Twain once said, "Forgiveness is the fragrance the violet sheds on the heel that has crushed it."

I have found that 'forgiveness' is a word that applies to me in seeking and granting it. There are times that I have to seek the forgiveness of those I have offended. At other times, I must grant forgiveness to those who request it from me. Pity the person who does neither; who thinks they have wronged no one or are above righting a wrong they may have created.

As our relationships deal with others, it is interesting to see how people deal with others when a mistake has been committed.

There are two kinds of people -- the responders and the reactors.

The responders are those who know how to think things through and put themselves in the shoes of those who have committed the mistake. They have an immediate spirit of forgiveness instead of a spirit of condemnation.

The reactors are those who immediately fly off the handle and usually end up saying things they later regret.

As a reminder - each year we celebrate Easter to hear those eternal words spoken in love from the cross, "Father, forgive them for they know not what they do." Those words still echo across the heavenly skies.

Old friend Robert said, “Mistakes are always forgivable, if one has the courage to admit them. If you cannot forgive and forget -- pick one."

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111





From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

The second mile in life

January 21, 2019



As a parent - we are always seeking to teach our children the right way of doing things. It is only natural, particularly for teenagers, to do the minimum.

My youngest daughter, who is now married and has a one-year-old daughter, was a social butterfly when she was growing up. She has always been very thoughtful and caring, but she also has a mind of her own.

One of the few chores she had at home (a term used by old people from childhood) is to do the dishes. That means once a day...not when she felt like it or when both sinks were piled full and we are having to eat off paper plates.

There were times she was walking out the door and I reminded her she wasn't leaving until the dishes were done -- which means I got to hear the purse slam on the floor and a few huffs and puffs. But at the least the dishes got done.

Now that she is a mom -- she has already started to let us know how she is going to lay down the law with Leighton. We'll see!

The phrase "going the second mile" has found its way into our modern jargon. It has its roots in first-century Palestine. The Romans had conquered much of the known world. One of the marvels of their conquest was a vast system of super highways which they had built to and from their conquered territories. There were over 50,000 miles of these Roman roads throughout the empire. At each mile was a stone marker.

The New Oxford English Dictionary calls them "guide stones." These guide stones pointed direction, determined distance, warned of dangers and each one of them had the miles to Rome etched upon them. Hence the phrase, "all roads lead to Rome."

By Roman law a Roman citizen could compel a subject from one of the conquered lands to carry his backpack, or load, for him for one mile, but one mile only.

Guide Stone #1 - The mandated mile – motivated by law

The first mile is always the hardest. Ask the distance runner for example. But if it were not for the first mile, there would be no possibility of the second mile. We live in a world where many do not even make it to the first mile marker. That is, they do not even do what is required of them at the office, at home, at church, at school, or wherever. The first mile is vitally important. It is what makes us function. It is that which is required of us.

Guide Stone #2 – the miracle mile – motivated by love

This mile is motivated by love and respect. What is it that separates some from others in the world of athletics? The second mile, doing what is required and then some. What separates some from others in the arts or in education or wherever? It is this principal of the second mile.

You may be required to carry someone's load the first mile. You have the right to stop. But the true act of love for others is going the extra mile when you don't have to. Why not try it? The one you help will be grateful and you will have joy in your heart that the world can't give.

Old friend Robert said, "One of the most important principles of success is developing the habit of going the extra mile. The man who does more than he is paid for will soon be paid for more than he does."

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111





From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

Life is measured by what you have learned

January 15, 2019



One thing I have a hard time with is being around people who seem to be so miserable. Do you know what I mean? When I think of that first sentence -- my mind immediately goes to a couple I saw a little over a year ago at a sporting event. I don't know their names - but I have never seen them smile, but I sure have seen and heard how miserable they are by the way they have talked to others -- especially people they don't know.

I am a firm believer in laughter and making others laugh. It seems that no matter where I go -- I find myself around people who feel the same way. Yet - when those who are miserable enter the room -- they continue to wear that scowl on their face and it doesn't take long for them to feel uneasy in their surroundings and leave.

Someone once said, "If you say you are happy -- then make sure you tell your face so others will know it."

I love the word "joy" and it should translate into happiness. But I have also learned that "joy" is an inside job. There is no way that you can express outward joy unless it begins inside your heart. You can't manufacture it. You certainly can't be in a room full of people who have joy and try to fool others because those who have inside joy can spot a fake a mile away.

My mother-in-law is named Joy. My oldest daughter is named LeJoy - which means "The Joy!" My one-year-old granddaughter is named Leighton Joy. All three are a joy to my life.

I have spent years collecting things that "I've learned..." Perhaps a few more will bring joy and peace to your life.

  • I've learned...That money doesn't buy class.
  • I've learned...That it's those small daily happenings that make life so spectacular.
  • I've learned...That under everyone's hard shell is someone who wants to be appreciated and loved.
  • I've learned...That to ignore the facts does not change the facts.
  • I've learned...That when you plan to get even with someone, you are only letting that person continue to hurt you.
  • I've learned...That love, not time, heals all wounds.
  • I've learned...That everyone you meet deserves to be greeted with a smile.
  • I've learned...That there's nothing sweeter than holding your grandbabies and feeling their breath on your cheeks.
  • I've learned...That no one is perfect until you fall in love with them.
  • I've learned...That when you harbor bitterness, happiness will dock elsewhere.
  • I've learned...That a smile is an inexpensive way to improve your looks.
  • I've learned...That I can choose how I feel.
  • I've learned...That when your newly born child or, in my case, grandchild holds your little finger in their little fist, that you're hooked for life.
  • I've learned...That everyone wants to live on top of the mountain, but all the happiness and growth occurs in the valley.

I trust that you are experience great blessing at the start of a new year. May 2019 be your greatest year ever as you continue to learn life's lessons.

Old friend Robert said, "They say a person needs just three things to be truly happy in this world: someone to love, something to do, and something to hope for. The most wasted of all days is one without laughter."

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111





From the Cluttered Desk... by Dr. David Davis

Four reasons our resolutions don't work

January 8, 2019



Four reasons our resolutions don't work

The health clubs and the spas, do they love January! And beyond probably. Business skyrockets when December bulges turn to January workouts. The infamous New Year's resolution: A resolution according to the dictionary is "A firm decision to do or not to do something." Unfortunately, research shows that about 88% of our resolutions won't happen.

It's not that we aren't sincere; we want to improve. We want to be healthier. We want to spend more time with the family, get out of debt, do better in school, clean out the junk in our house, maybe in us. So why do our great intentions so often end up in failed commitments?

Number one, we're not specific.

Goals have to be more than just general intentions. "I'm going to get in shape." "I want to make more of a difference." Those intentions probably won't succeed. We need to be more specific and measurable enough to give a person a decent shot at really changing.

Here's the second reason I think we fail. We're not accountable.

A resolution between me, myself and I is just too easy to forget. But when you announce to several key people the commitment you've made, you've put yourself on the line to do it.

Here's a third reason that our resolutions fail. We give up too soon.

You know, babies learn to walk by a process that I call "step ... boom!" They fall down, but they don't stay down. They get up! Next time it's "step, step, step ... boom!" Until one day they're rocketing across the room. My one-year-old granddaughter, Leighton, is now going through that process!

Sadly, when we fall down in our effort to do better, don't we often just stay down? But one day's failure is just one day's failure. One day - keep it that way. Get up and keep walking!

And the final reason - maybe the most important of all - why we don't improve like we want to improve is we've got a power shortage.

Especially when it comes to the changes that really matter, like breaking the cycle that's hurting the people you love, conquering that dark part that's brought you down again and again, moving beyond the pain of your past, attacking that fatal flaw that has cost you so much.

We may joke about various resolutions, but deep in our heart, we long to change or adjust some attitudes, actions, or habits that we don't like about ourselves.

I have decided that I am going to exercise. Certainly not the same way I did when I was playing college football -- but I am going to do more than lift a fork to my mouth.

A few years ago -- my kids bought me a new bike. I haven't ridden it much -- so then they decided that I needed a stationary bike. That way I can't make excuses about the elements being too hot, too cold, too wet, etc.

I did ask them to get the kind where I can hang a bag of chips on the handle bars on one side and a bag of candy on the other....OK - I'm just kidding.

Over the past two years, I have lost over 20 pounds so I am on the right track. I would like to get rid of a little more so I hope that I will see that happen in 2019.

Old friend Robert says, "What the New Year brings to you will depend a great deal on what you bring to the New Year."

Here's to a most blessed New Year and watching Judge Judy while riding on my indoor bike!

E-mail: drdaviddavis@yahoo.com

Website: www.reporternewssports.com

Twitter: @drdavis111








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